eating a wounded chicken?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lauratkennedy, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. lauratkennedy

    lauratkennedy New Egg

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    Nov 5, 2011
    Hello, We have a flock of 8 backyard birds, 2 New England Reds, 1 Gold Sexlink, 3 speckled Sussex, 2 Barred Rock. They have been happy and healthy since we got them (as chicks) early this spring. A few weeks back our Sexlink was attacked by a ferrel cat and she has been recovering ever since. We have her seperated from the flock and she seemed to be healing well until yesterday when we noticed she has started to limp. We are new to birds and we have them for eggs, but we intend to eat them when they lay off laying in another year or so. We have tried to introduce the injured bird back into the flock and they will have nothing to do with her so we are now stuck with a bird that is not laying, who appears to still have some injury, and who the other birds don't want around. We have concluded that we are going to cull her, but we are wondering if we can eat her (even just use her for bone broth if that is the only thing possible) and we want to know, given her injury, if that is a wise idea. What do you all think?
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    I am normally OK with eating just about any bird, but in this case I would not do it. The bird may have an infection, which although is not likely to be transmissible to humans, is still unsavory enough to give me pause. There are some diseases that are able to be transmitted to humans from cats, and I am not positive that a chicken could not be a disease vector in this case. I would err on the side of caution and pass on this bird.

    Sorry. Good luck.
     
  3. bambi

    bambi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2010
    Mo.
    I agree with CMV

    I am normally OK with eating just about any bird, but in this case I would not do it. The bird may have an infection, which although is not likely to be transmissible to humans, is still unsavory enough to give me pause. There are some diseases that are able to be transmitted to humans from cats, and I am not positive that a chicken could not be a disease vector in this case. I would err on the side of caution and pass on this bird​
     

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