eating the first egg

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by phickle, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. phickle

    phickle Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2014
    near Tyler, TX
    the phirst egg!


    [​IMG]

    I just couldn't put it off any longer. Some eggs were given away, some chucked into the woods because we didn't collect them for a week, and the rest started filling up the fridge. I had to eat one. Plus, the kids wanted to try one, too, but only after I had (how brave!). The pic above is three bantam eggs in a six inch skillet. The kiddos and I each got one, and imagine our surprise when it tasted like... egg. LOL. We didn't notice any difference compared to store eggs except for the size.

    Cookies, omelets, waffles, we use them without a second thought now, although the size conversion sometimes doesn't quite work out right. It feels funny to say "6 egg omelet". The next experiment is dehydrated egg.
     
  2. cackleberrycam

    cackleberrycam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How fun! :D
     
  3. lularat

    lularat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 10, 2013
    NC
    When I got my first egg, my son and I immediately went into the house and fried it. Of course, after we took pictures of it. Best egg I believe I have ever eaten. :) Those are tiny eggs. How do you dehydrate eggs?
     
  4. cackleberrycam

    cackleberrycam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 28, 2013
    Fresh eggs always taste the best!! [​IMG]
     
  5. phickle

    phickle Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2014
    near Tyler, TX
    Lularat, I'd have to find the instructions for an exact recipe, but here's what I remember, off the top of the head:

    everything super clean. cracks eggs into blender, blend. pour into a fruit roll sheet of the dehydrator. dehydrate at 155 degrees F. until dry and crispy, about 8 hours. using blender, processor, or coffee grinder, powder the hard dry egg. store. rehydrate with boiling water for use.

    If memory serves, I read that it lasts a year just in a sealed container. My hope is that it will last at least 2 if vacuum sealed and in the dark. Also, the article only mentioned whole eggs, so a natural sub-experiment will be to see if yolks and whites can be separated and dried as well.
     

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