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Edit: Found a home! SE Connecticut Coronation Sussex laying hen born 2014 needs a safe home- not for

Discussion in 'Animals In Need of Free Re-Homing' started by RustyBulleit, Jan 7, 2017.

  1. RustyBulleit

    RustyBulleit Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    24
    Nov 2, 2013
    Connecticut
    Hello all,
    I had a small backyard flock of two laying hens, but one passed away from cancer this past week (I have a lab report from UCONN showing that she did not die from a communicable disease). My Coronation Sussex hen, Violet, is terribly lonely and I think she would benefit from having a new flock. She is currently laying one egg a day. She will go broody if the egg is not collected every day. I feed her New Country Organics soy free grain, fresh chopped kale, oyster shell, dried kelp, and leftover yogurt, eggs, veggies from the day. She also gets dried meal worms as a treat. She can be skittish and is not keen on being held (she bonded with my Barred Rock), but if you work with her everyday she may come around. She is originally from Pennsylvania Dutch Country, I paid $35 for her at 16 weeks old, and I raised her inside my house until she was big enough to fend for herself in my yard with Clover, the alpha hen. She is healthy, parasite free, chatty, and she likes to free range. She was raised around dogs and cats, but is wary around unfamiliar animals. I would prefer she go to a home where predators are not an issue (if you lose birds regularly to raccoons or dogs don't bother responding), and chickens are viewed as pets not just producers. I hate having to give her away, but I cannot take on anymore animals and she needs other birds to keep her company. If you are interested in adopting Violet I would like to see where you will keep her. She comes with a bag of grain, treats, and supplements, a waterer and hanging feeder if you want. You can have her coop too as long as you are willing to move it yourself- it's heavy, you'll need a pick-up truck or van.


    Thank you for reading.
    She will be greatly missed.

    Photo 1: tending to her dying flock mate

    .[​IMG]

    Photo 2: Being sassy for the camera

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017

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