EDUCATIONAL INCUBATION & HATCHING CHAT THREAD, w/ Sally Sunshine. Hosts, BantyChooks and more!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Sally Sunshine, Oct 12, 2016.

  1. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Crossing the Road

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    bummer hows the rut? not good right now?
     
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  2. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Crossing the Road

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    night yall wherever ya went!
     
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  3. BullChick

    BullChick Not who you think

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    Coffee shop
    Now he is.
     
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  4. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Crossing the Road

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    Grower Guidelines for Poultry and Fowl Processing
    LIVE AND DRESSED WEIGHTS

    (article no longer found on Inet)

    1.1. Assessing live weight of bird In order to schedule the processing of your birds, it is necessary to estimate the approximate processing date based on your target live weight. Any reliable scale can provide a live weight of a bird or fowl provided that the animal has minimal movement when weighing. A small cage or crate can be used. Be sure to tare or zero out the scale or subtract the weight of the ca ge or crate only from the weight of the crate and bird to get net weight of the bird.

    Dressed weights are about 75% of live weight . Most chicken is processed at a 4.5 pounds live weight, and this varies according to the meat product desired. The following dressed weights are what can generally be expected: • Cornish Game Hen 1.5 pounds • Fryer, broiler 3 to 4 pounds • Roaster 5 to 6 pounds • Stewing hen 6+ pounds December 2007 page 4 of 25 For example: Crate + bird weight 6.7 pounds Crate weight 2.3 pounds Net weight of bird 4.4 pounds Estimated dressed weight 4.4 x 0.75 = 3.3 pounds Both the breed of bird and the method of chilling affect the dressed weight. For example, water chilled Cornish X’s may be 75%; whereas, air-chilled Cornish X’s may be 72%. An air chilled heritage bird or other slow growing bird may be 68-70%. Exact determination of carcass weight ratios can only be determined by experience, and growers who have clients with very specific weight requirements should keep this in mind. x2
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2017
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  5. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Crossing the Road

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    @Chaos18
    Chaos' bird holder for processing

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  6. Christinecam

    Christinecam Songster

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    3 babies! Once they rest they zip so quick I miss em. I think I’ll have to figure out a way to have a small can inside
     
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  7. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Crossing the Road

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    BYC did not carry over the rest of this quote who made this!

    Santa bread
    [​IMG]

    So tonight while I wait to see if BabyBear becomes a mama I am going to make small dinner size ones [​IMG]
    That way everyone can Butter up their own Santa [​IMG]

    Really not sure why I love that joke but seems I am the only one in my house who thinks it is funny.

    I used this recipe
    Golden Santa Bread
    Yield: Serves 8-10

    Ingredients
    • 3 and 1/2 to 4 cups bread flour, spooned and leveled
    • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons salt
      [​IMG] Coupons
    • 1/2 cup milk
    • 1/4 cup water
    • 1/4 cup (half stick) butter, cubed
    • 1/2 cup sugar
    • 2 tablespoons yeast
    • 2 eggs
    • 2 raisins
    • 2 egg yolks, separated in 2 bowls
    • lots of red food coloring
    Instructions
    1. In a large bowl or stand mixer, combine 2 cups of the bread flour and the salt.
    2. In a glass measuring cup, heat the milk, water and butter to 120°-130° in the microwave (or in a pot on the stove.) (Heat the mixture until the butter is partially melted, then stir it to melt it the rest of the way. Don't add the liquid to the yeast mixture until your finger dipped in it feels comfortably warm, but not hot.)
    3. Add the sugar and yeast to the liquid. If you are confident that your yeast is not dead, then move on to the next step. Otherwise wait 5 minutes to see if it starts to foam.
    4. Add liquid to dry ingredients; beat just until moistened. Beat in 2 eggs until smooth.
    5. Stir in enough of the remaining flour to form a dough. The dough should come together in a ball, but it's okay if it sticks a little. Add flour until you can handle the dough without it a big mess on your hands.
    6. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. (Or beat with the dough hook for 6-8 minutes.)
    7. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, at least an hour and a half, mine took 2.
    8. Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into two portions, one slightly larger than the other.
    9. Shape the larger portion into an elongated triangle with rounded corners for Santa's head and hat. Transfer to a large greased cookie sheet.
    10. Divide the smaller portion in half. Shape and flatten one half into a beard. Using scissors or a pizza cutter, cut into strips to within 1 in. of top. Cut the strips pretty thin so that they are easy to twist. Position on Santa's face; twist and curl strips.
    11. Use the remaining dough for the mustache, nose, hat pom-pom and brim. Shape a portion of dough into a mustache; flatten and cut the ends into small strips with scissors. Place above beard.
    12. Place a small ball above mustache for nose. Fold tip of hat over and add another ball for pom-pom.
    13. Roll out a narrow piece of dough to create a hat brim; position under hat and tuck the edges underneath the base dough.
    14. With a scissors, cut two slits for eyes; insert raisins into slits.
    15. In separate small bowls, beat egg each yolk. Brush plain yolk over portions of dough that will not be red. Add red food coloring to one yolk; carefully brush over hat, nose and cheeks. (You have to do the regular yolk first otherwise the color will run.)
    16. Cover loosely with foil that has been coated with nonstick spray. Try to avoid letting the foil touch the bread, you don't want to tear your bread.
    17. Let dough rise another half hour. Bake at 350° for 15 minutes. Uncover; bake 5-10 minutes longer or until golden brown. Cool on a wire rack. Take pictures. Bask in the admiration of whoever sees it.
    Notes
    Santa Bread is a great make-ahead Christmas breakfast. Make the bread a few days or even a couple weeks before you want to serve it, then freeze, sealed tightly. (Use aluminum foil and plastic wrap. If it will fit into a 2-gallon freezer ziplock, use that.) Remove from the oven and let thaw on the counter without unwrapping it. Set your oven to 350 degrees. When the oven is hot and the bread is thawed, bake for 5-10 minutes, just until heated. Serve warm.
    http://thefoodcharlatan.com/2014/11/26/golden-santa-bread/
    It was fun and easy. I added all spice and pulled on Santa's beard the whole first day.
    Now I am going to try the dinner roll size Santa's Same recipe just no extra spices just a lightly sweet bread.
     
  8. Christinecam

    Christinecam Songster

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    371801B7-E08A-452D-8298-9749E80B69DB.jpeg
    371801B7-E08A-452D-8298-9749E80B69DB.jpeg Baby 1 passed out on the eggs. 8F868DD0-18A1-4E5C-B631-7647C86B5B68.jpeg Looking up.. “hi momma”
    E7112A5D-6A9B-4DF1-A25E-F647F61ADF1A.jpeg And babies two and three.
    The pics are awful through the bators plastic. But they are super cute
     
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  9. Christinecam

    Christinecam Songster

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