EE attacked by a dog

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Canvasb, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. Canvasb

    Canvasb New Egg

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    Sep 6, 2012
    Needing some guidance for my injured chicken. Yesterday, a dog broke through the chicken wire in our coup, killed one chicken and seriously injured Annie, one of our other chickens. The wound on Annie's back extends from the bottom of her neck down to her mid back and down her right back going under her wing. The underside of her wing has been plucked clean but no apparent wounds to the wing itself. The wound on her back is much more HORRIFIC. The layers of skin and fat were mauled down to the muscle and there is even a large chunk of muscle that was eaten off. We contemplated putting her down but after pulling her out of the coup and setting her in the yard, she began grazing. Annie let me clean her back with antiseptic spray and apply Neosporin. She's eating, drinking, and pooping still. I initially wrapped the wound with gauze but then removed it due to the gauze sticking after only a few hours. I'm not sure what to do. Even though she's still eating, etc, does she have a chance? Infection is inevitable, especially to the part of the wound that extends under her wing. It is warm and moist under there which is a breeding ground for bacteria. I don't know how to keep that area aired. The entire wound is about 3.5 inches long , 5 inches wide. I cannot afford to take her to the vet. My questions are:

    1. Any advice on antibiotics and what works best?
    2. Keep the area open or covered? (I've read in different forums and some said covered, some said open.)
    3. How many times per day do I need to clean it?
    4. What solution is best to clean it with?
    5. Diet? (She's been eating scraps of cucumbers, carrots, scrambled eggs and greek yogurt along with her chicken feed and water.) Any other suggestions??
    6. How can i keep her wing propped up to get some air circulating under it?
    7. Does she truly having a fighting chance or am i delaying the obvious?

    These are my primary questions. I know there are more but can't think of any at the moment. Annie stayed inside our house during the night and will remain there for awhile. Any advice is very much appreciated.
     
  2. thebanthams

    thebanthams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Im sorry you had to go through this. hasnt happen to me yet. Keep it very clean and apply neospiron twice a day . clean with warm water, there is a bacterin wash you can buy at drug stores. keep it covered for few days to keep it from getting infections. feed like you always do and special treats. some do very well surviving attacks. somewhere on another thread someones duck was nearly killed. but made it through ! Hope someone else have better ideas. Keep us post hows shes doing !
     
  3. Canvasb

    Canvasb New Egg

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    Sep 6, 2012
    Pictures are graphic! The wounds aren't as big as I initally remembered. (My brain was traumatized, sorry!) It's approximately 2.5 in x 3 in. You can't tell the depth or see where the muscle was eaten through because of the weeping and because a "goo" has already started forming over everything.

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  4. kippyafd

    kippyafd Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 1, 2013
    One of our hens has a mystery wound under her wing. Don't know what happened to her. Could it be from mating? We have 3 roosters. I out salve on it a couple times. I have seen her peck at it, I assume she is able to clean it. She isn't very cooperative, even to out on it. I am impressed you can clean and bandage it! I think do what you are doing and hope for the best. My hens wound is probably 2x2 inches. She is eating and acting normal. It happened 4 says ago. I figure if she acts normal, she does not have an infection.

    Don't know if that helps, sometimes it's good to read a similar story. I would just keep an eye on her. If she does get an infection, my husband will take her out of her misery.
     
  5. chelsebell

    chelsebell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 23, 2013
    Issaquah, WA
    I am going on just over 2 weeks of tending a dog maul wound on one of my hens her wound was much larger a 4 x 8 gauze still doesn't cover it and lots of skin and muscle was lost but she is healing very well. If they are eating and drinking and going to the bathroom and the wound doesn't get infected she will be just fine! As for antibiotics you want something that is effective against gram negative and gram positive bacteria I have been injecting subcutaneously my hen twice daily because of the severity of he wound. I highly recommend bringing her inside if you haven't already in a dog kennel so the other chickens can't peck at her wound if she is out during the day and you can monitor her better. I think I will be living with a chicken in my house for another few weeks. I also would get or make a chicken saddle with any basic sewing skills one can be made and that way she can't peck at the wound especially if the middle part between the wings is made a little longer towards her neck. I can help you if that doesn't make sense. They make an impregnated gauze that is soaked in sterile gel that helps naturally clean and debride the wound It has been the best wound dressing as it doesn't dry out and adhere to the wound for 3-4 days and when it begins to dry it naturally cleans all the gunk out of the wound. You should be able to see my thread on documenting my hens recovery and I have links to the places you can purchase the wound care supplies. How does the wound smell? That is always an indicator of how it is healing. If you don;t want to use antibiotics then I highly highly recommend Thermazene a silver sulfadiazine cream that is effective against gram-negative and gram-postive bacteria if you clean the wound with saline or distilled water to rinse any debris and then cover with thermazene and impregnated gauze and a chicken saddle. If you need other suggestions that are purchased from a local feed store or something let me know. Or any questions I am happy to help. If you follow my routine you will need to check the wound daily but after a few days you shouldn't have to clean it and rinse it more than a few times per week which makes healing easier since you don't have to fuss with them as much. The chicken saddle may also help with getting some air under the wing but if there isn't an open wound there just no feathers and some raw skin it should be just fine :) I would definitely keep the wound covered and make sure the neosporin is just plain not the pain kind. What area are you located? I would say you aren't delaying the inevitable but you need to make sure she doesn't get infected!

    Take Care,
    Chelsea
     
  6. Canvasb

    Canvasb New Egg

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    Sep 6, 2012
    The neosporin is plain. The wound under her wing is actually on her back but it sits directly under her wing where it is attached to her body. Thank you so much for your advice. I read the info on your thread and it is very helpful! My chicken hasn't been as active today so I'm a little more worried now than I was last night. I will try your routine and see how it goes. By the way, what antiobiotic are/were you giving your chicken?
     
  7. chelsebell

    chelsebell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 23, 2013
    Issaquah, WA
    I gave her baytril common for dogs and cats 22.7 mg/ml .5cc under her skin 2x per day. It could also be given orally but for me it was easier to inject. Your local feed store probably has Duramycin 10 to put in drinking water but I think that is more effective for respiratory infections. But I believe it also works on gram-negative and gram-postive bacteria just maybe not as well as some other antibiotics and especially if they aren't drinking well you don't know how much they have received. It would be better than nothing if you fear infection or the wound begins to smell. Natural oozing will occur for a week or more. If you need antibiotics I could probably help you I just use the tiny syringes that people use for insulin injections. If she is more restless today and you are putting her out during the day I would bring her in and give her a heat light and a few days rest. The other chickens may give her a real hard time for a while and cause her more harm. The reason the thermazene cream is so amazing is because not only does it help generate granulation and new tissue it topically controls infection and you could likely forgo the use of an antibiotic unless there are some really deep punctures but even then you can rinse them out and squirt some cream down in them. My girl had ups and downs at first and needed a lot of rest so I wouldn't worry about restlessness as long as she is still eating and drinking a little each day...it took nearly a week for mine to get a good healthy appetite back and really perk up so don't give up she is still in slight shock I am sure. Let me know if I can help :)
     
  8. chelsebell

    chelsebell Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 23, 2013
    Issaquah, WA
    Also I would be sure to trim the feathers with scissors on the flaps of damaged skin if you pack the wound right they may decide to re-adhere to the muscle below. The weight of the feathers could cause the skin to tear more or have trouble healing just from getting stuck in the ooze drainage...
     
  9. mychickenbrood

    mychickenbrood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2012
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    I don't have much experience with poultry injuries, but am learning. I posted this evening, under this topic and I titled it something like, "bloody neck wound."

    The suggestion of a "saddle" is a great idea. I was trying to think of ways to cover it, and then read that post.

    I would clean it with saline though, not plain water, because saline is closer to what the tissues are bathed in, in the body. You can buy it (ask a pharmacist) and can even make your own. I do not remember how, but it is easy and I'm sure a member here can tell you, or simply Google it.

    Any time a dressing sticks to a wound, just soak it good with saline. Little by little, gently pull it away. Might take awhile, but it will come off.

    If you can cover it, after applying an antibiotic ointment of course, and treating with oral or injectible antibiotics of course, I would allow the chicken back with the flock. I think it is harder for them to be separated, unless they are very tame and used to it.

    Of course, if she seems to weaken, I'd separate her then.

    Good luck. You posted such great pictures. Would you be willing to post some at different stages of healing? I think we could all learn from it.
     
  10. mychickenbrood

    mychickenbrood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2012
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    Would you be willing to share the progress in pictures? It might benefit many of us.

    Sounds like you really know what you are doing.
     

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