EE cross egg color

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by kywest, Jan 5, 2011.

  1. kywest

    kywest Out Of The Brooder

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    I had an EE roo that crossed with my hens - 2 EE, an black australorp, a golden comet and a barred rock. Two chicks are EE colored, one is barred, and the other 3 are black. How did this happen?? The three black chicks all look just like the australorp. If any are hens, what color are the eggs likely to be? I'm going to try to post pics to get opinions on gender...is it too early to tell? They are about 8 weeks old.
     
  2. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    Hello there! I don't have an answer for you, but I just wanted to say hello because I'm from Ohio too! Strasburg Ohio, near Bolivar, Dover and New Philadelphia.

    Hello and welcome!
    Sharon
     
  3. txcarl1258

    txcarl1258 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can almost guarantee you that your barred chick is a roo. Barred pattern hens only pass on the barring pattern to their sons. The three black chicks are from your Lorp. If they are boys they will have some leakage be it red, gold, or silver. What ever color pattern your roo is. Post some pics we could at least make an educated guess for you on their genders.
     
  4. De

    De Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Camden,AR
    First, do the EE roo. come from a green egg?
    And I want to know more about the barred chick being a roo. if the hen is barred...
    How can you know that if you don't know all that was in the back ground of the hen and roo.?
    I ask b/c I have a ee/cochin hen that is blue and she was breed with a silkie barred/black cochin cross roo. that was barred
    and I have blue, barred, black, and roo. that is columbian barred and he is the only roo.
    So this only is if the hen is barred not the roo....
     
  5. jeslewmazer

    jeslewmazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 24, 2009
    Mississippi
    Quote:I am pretty sure txcarl1258 was talking about Black Sexlink, where if you cross almost any rooster (RIR, BO, etc.) with a barred hen (like BR, Dom, etc.) you get offspring that can be sexed by color from day one. But for more detailed information check out https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=261208
     
  6. RainbowBirds_of_a_Feather

    RainbowBirds_of_a_Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aloha,

    Wow you hatched a divers group of eggs. But congrats on your new additions!


    EE birds are just a Russian Roulette of mystery. Because they either come in homozygous and heterozygous forms of the egg color. Meaning they are not always true blue egg colored producers. They are precrossed with other birds from the hatchery. Often times getting birds that are in essence the look of an EE but not producing the desired egg color, hints the name "Easter Egger". Hens are easy to determine if they carry the trait for blue eggs. But that is when they lay their first egg. If it is a Roo, unless you know a geneticist and willing to pay the fee, then you can tell it for sure.


    But testing through breeding can determine certain truths about your EE Roo and the EE gals too.. Which you did by hatching babies. If the babies from that EE X EE mating are female and lay the colored eggs when they begin then you can assume they are Homozygous ("O,O") and or Heterozygous ("O,o") for the blue egg gene. But if you have a hen from that mating lay an egg outside of that color blue zone. Like a Brown, tinted, & white. Then you can assume that both parents carries an allele (gene) for that egg color which makes both parents Heterozygous (O,o) for the blue egg color . But again with the males, they may carry the recessive (o,o), less dominant gene. Known as Homozygous receive.
    But you will know for sure when the chicks get to laying age. But that is on a minor scale.

    Now since you did the other mating with other hens, this could give you the answer to your roo. If he is the Homozygous for the egg color, or at least a Heterozygous one, it will show. But you would need other produced hens to be sure of it. But I digress, the other hens are Brown layers. So when a blue layer crosses with the Brown layer you should get a Green colored layer. Which means the shell is blue and the brown is incorporated on the shell. (Still reading up on it but I know we have a geneticist person on here to give you an accurate deduction. This is just what I know from my own crossing/reading)

    But to have 3 black chicks, when you have a Golden Comet, I can only think that it is because the egg you picked up for hatching was either from the Barred rock and on or the Australorp. But you just have to wait till that chick grows. But when you breed a Red roo to a Barred hen you will have a sex-linked chick. Meaning the boy chicks will have a spot on head and the girl chick will be black with some brown on their head. SO I do believe you have a Roo chick there.

    If you can post pics then everyone can help. OMG I wrote alot hope it helps a little......[​IMG]
     
  7. txcarl1258

    txcarl1258 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    De wrote:

    First, do the EE roo. come from a green egg?
    And I want to know more about the barred chick being a roo. if the hen is barred...
    How can you know that if you don't know all that was in the back ground of the hen and roo.?
    I ask b/c I have a ee/cochin hen that is blue and she was breed with a silkie barred/black cochin cross roo. that was barred
    and I have blue, barred, black, and roo. that is columbian barred and he is the only roo.
    So this only is if the hen is barred not the roo....

    I am pretty sure txcarl1258 was talking about Black Sexlink, where if you cross almost any rooster (RIR, BO, etc.) with a barred hen (like BR, Dom, etc.) you get offspring that can be sexed by color from day one. But for more detailed information check out https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=261208

    Yes I was talking about a Sex-Link. Barred pattern hens can only pass the barred pattern to their male offspring. If the roo was carrying the barred gene he would express it with barring on his feathers. Most EEs are duckwing based and I am assuming that is the color pattern of the roo. They only way he would be carrying the barred gene would be if he was crossed with a BR, Dom, Delaware, etc. You can actually create Blue Sex-links by crossing a Blue or Splash roo with a barred hen. The blue replaces the black and gives you blue or black pullets and black and blue barred roos.​
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2011
  8. jeslewmazer

    jeslewmazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 24, 2009
    Mississippi
    Quote:I would think anything but white.
    Quote:Yes I was talking about a Sex-Link. Barred pattern hens can only pass the barred pattern to their male offspring. If the roo was carrying the barred gene he would express it with barring on his feathers. Most EEs are duckwing based and I am assuming that is the color pattern of the roo. They only way he would be carrying the barred gene would be if he was crossed with a BR, Dom, Delaware, etc. You can actually create Blue Sex-links by crossing a Blue or Splash roo with a barred hen. The blue replaces the black and gives you blue or black pullets and black and blue barred roos.

    Except for using a white roo over a barred hen. right? But then some recessive white roos might or might not work!?!? I have see EEs from hatcheries that are white. Would this mean that there is a good possibility to have recessive white roos? Does that increase the chance of failure in producing a sexlink?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2011
  9. txcarl1258

    txcarl1258 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The whole dominant versus recessive white is a little out of my limited knowledge of genetics. [​IMG] I am still trying to figure out what the difference in Dominant and Recessive white is. I know that one or possibly both can mask certain colors such as barring and they do not produce sex-links when bred to barred birds. Hopefully Illia or one of the other genetic gurus will come along and answer our question.
     
  10. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Almost all EE's from hatcheries are dominant white. If the EE rooster the OP has is purely a dominant white, the chicks wouldn't turn out the color they did. If the rooster is only partially dominant white, the OP's offspring got the luck of the draw with the 50% chance of chicks not being white.

    Dominant White is different from Recessive White mainly in that if crossed with another color, it will dominate the other color. The offspring will be either pure white with smudgy coloring or mostly white with the other parent's coloring showing through. A Recessive White crossed to another will throw NO white birds. A recessive white needs to alleles (genes, I guess I could say) to actually show up. A dominant white is fine with one.

    As said before, the barred one is indeed a cockerel. A barred hen with another color of bird makes sex-linked offspring, and your black chicks may quite likely be the female, non-barred version, too.

    8 Weeks old is not too early to tell gender. Go ahead and post pics. [​IMG]

    The egg color may vary. If the Easter Egger rooster had genes for a green egg (brownxblue) you'll get a 50% of green egg layers and of brown egg layers. If he had both genes for the blue egg (bluexblue) then all or at least 90% of the offspring/hens will lay green eggs.

    A good way of making sure he actually has those genes and not just brown genes or green verging on brown - Look at his comb. If it has three nice even rows of bumps (pea comb) he doesn't have the genes for purely brown eggs. If it is floppy or really tall, there is a likely chance he's got the genes for green eggs. If it is a decent looking pea comb, they're likely blue egg genes in there. Also if his earlobes are red, that rules out really pale or white eggs. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2011

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