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egg color

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by seminolewind, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Sep 6, 2007
    spring hill, florida
    Is there a difference between white eggs and brown eggs? Like in taste, etc? Karen
     
  2. Frozen Feathers

    Frozen Feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2007
    Maine
    The brown ones taste like chocolate! [​IMG] Okay obviously I'm kidding but there's no difference. [​IMG]
     
  3. Windy Ridge

    Windy Ridge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 3, 2007
    Appalachia
    Nope, Angie's right: no difference.

    The BIG difference in taste is between eggs from hens that have been raised on pasture and have had access to greens and bugs, and hens that have been raised commercially in battery cages.

    Eggs from hens that have had access to greens and bugs and other things generally have dark yellow or orange yolks and a very rich flavor in comparison to commercial eggs. This holds true when comparing any color farm egg to any color commercial egg.

    Here's an article about how much healthier eggs from pasture-raised hens are, too.
     
  4. earthnut

    earthnut Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2007
    Seattle, Cascadia
    no difference. There's a misconception that brown eggs come from free range chickens and white eggs from battery chickens, and hence brown eggs are healthier, but that's not true. You can raise any breed in any condition. It has much more to do with the food the hens get, not the shell color or where they're raised.

    Even free range, pasture fed hens don't give eggs that are all that different. They do tend to be higher in omega 3, etc, but there's no guarantee of that unless what they eat is carefully monitored. Poor pasture doesn't boost the egg's nutrition. The highest eggs in omega 3 are battery hens fed a special high-flaxseed diet.

    I've never noticed a difference in taste, myself, between any eggs.
     

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