Egg Experiment

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by chickened, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. chickened

    chickened Overrun With Chickens

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    I am conducting an experiment on hatching eggs. I am going to take eggs of various ages like 1 day old up to 10 day old, package them as if for shipping, simulate a shipping environment by shaking them, dropping them and putting them in cold temperatures and then open them in 4 days and see what the look like under candling and then incubate them.

    I have often wondered how or what causes them to not hatch and what extent of damage is actually caused from shipping in a hope to better my shipping methods and then share the results.

    Anything that I have overlooked please bring to my attention.
     
  2. DirtCreature

    DirtCreature Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sad. LOL

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  3. SkyeSchazade

    SkyeSchazade Out Of The Brooder

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    I saw posted somewhere that its the change in air pressure when eggs are flown that causes the most damage. Eggs packed properly do well for the most part with being tossed around.
     
  4. chickened

    chickened Overrun With Chickens

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    I can simulate that with my air compressor if I knew the pressure change at 30,000 feet.

    I wonder if shell thickness is a factor?

     
  5. hemet dennis

    hemet dennis Chillin' With My Peeps

    An air compressor wont do it you need a vacuum pump and a sealed chamber to put the box in.



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  6. chickened

    chickened Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 2, 2010
    western Oregon
    Like a plastic bucket with a lid and my shop vac?

     
  7. hemet dennis

    hemet dennis Chillin' With My Peeps

    You would need a vacuum gauge and if you're about sea level you will need to get about 10 and a half PSI of vacuum for 30,000 ft.



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