1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

egg genes

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by treeclimber233, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. treeclimber233

    treeclimber233 Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    129
    Nov 12, 2007
    I am still trying to understand the blue/green gene. I got 4 chickens from a friend. i roo and three hens. One hen lay a blue egg, one lay a light green egg and the other lay a pinkish egg. Of course the roo I have no idea what color egg he came from. This year I have a bunch of dark green egg layers. If I understand the genetics behind the egg color I am going to guess he was hatched from a green egg. Two of the hens (the blue layer and the pink layer) my friend got with the roo. The third hen was the offspring of the trio. So I am guessing the roo mated with the light green layer and I got a bunch of babies that lay dark green eggs. If I take the dark green egg layers and put them with their father that will make their eggs even darker right??? (Does this make any sense to anyone???) I want to seperate everyone into breeding pens and sell egg for hatching this spring.
     
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I remember there was some links on egg color genetics but I don't remember where they were posted. I believe white is white, brown is brown and green is brown over blue, and blue is blue. I've also heard egg genes are more attributed to the rooster's genetics than the hens. With olive green eggs, my guess is he's a brown egg layer... parent. Good luck on your search!
     
  3. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

    8,429
    133
    331
    Jan 18, 2008
    Newman Lake, WA
    I am a "dummy" when it comes to genetic terms, but I know you want to breed from a rooster that is hatched from a blue egg.

    I believe someone once explained to me the rooster carries two genes for traits (color, size, egg color) and a hen only one, so you are more likely to get specific traits from the male.

    Someone on here knows genetics better than I, come on people.......
     
  4. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    5,928
    44
    293
    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    The green is blue over brown. Sign of an EE rather than a true blue egg layer.

    Does the roo have Muffs, Beard, or pea comb?

    Same question for the hens?

    That will aid in guessing the outcome.
     
  5. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    5,928
    44
    293
    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    Forgot to ask. What color are their legs?
     
  6. treeclimber233

    treeclimber233 Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    129
    Nov 12, 2007
    The hens have the muffs and beard. I think the roo does too. (I have so many I can't remember right off. Most of the sons do.) All I am keeping for breeding have willow green legs. When I got the original group there was a roo with yellow legs that was named Stewpot early on. (Don't tell my friend.) Some of the babies had yellow legs and um......are no longer in my flock. (Don't tell my friend.) Does this also point to EE's. I guess Americanas don't lay green eggs. In order to get the green egg you have to breed a brown layer which changes the babies to EE's right?
     
  7. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

    Nov 16, 2007
    San Antonio TX
    Actually, there are some lines/strains of Ameraucana that are still working on egg color, it is possible, though not desirable in standard bred Ameraucanas.

    Given your other descriptions, it is very likely that you have EEs.

    The slate leg thing is not always true, I have an EE rooster that has slate legs. His color tells me he's an EE.

    A green egg is a blue egg with brown "painted" on it.

    There are two "true" colors of eggs, white and blue. Blue is dominant to white.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by