Egg layer diet

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by doublel, Dec 8, 2007.

  1. doublel

    doublel New Egg

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    Dec 8, 2007
    WY
    Hi, I am new to raising laying hens. My eggs just aren't quite right. I know they will be different from store bought eggs, but they don't seem to taste much at all and the white is very watery. I am feeding them a layer diet from my local feed store, with free oyster shell offering. Is there something else I need to do. The girls go out in the day and have a small outside run.
     
  2. poppycat

    poppycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 26, 2007
    Could you clarify, are they out in a run or out in your yard? Egg quality dramatically improves with access to green stuff and bugs which are both scarce in the winter. The more you can vary their diet, the better IMO. Try giving them veggie trimmings (except no potato peels) and some green leafy stuff.

    If you have brand new layers, give them a few weeks and then re-evaluate.

    My eggs have a much more subtle taste than store eggs, It's less sulpher-y. I thought it was an improvement, but it might take some getting used to.
     
  3. poppycat

    poppycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 26, 2007
    Oh sorry, welcome to BYC! [​IMG]
     
  4. doublel

    doublel New Egg

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    Dec 8, 2007
    WY
    Thanks for the welcome! In the summer and early fall they run on a quarter acre of ground chasing the sheep. But in the winter I keep them in a run so that I can put them away at night, it has been getting pretty cold. They have been laying for a couple of months now. I tried to feed them some lettuce today and they didn't look overly impressed, maybe they just need to get used to the idea. Also I have heard that leghorns are excellent egg layers, but mine are laying 8 eggs a week, is that normal?
     
  5. CovenantCreek

    CovenantCreek Chicks Rule!

    Oct 19, 2007
    Franklin, TN
    Maybe it would help if you mentioned how many hens you have and how old they are. Leghorns in general are known for good egg production, but if they're very young or over 1-2 yrs old it can have an impact. They could also be slowing down due to the cold, short hours of daylight, loss of their freedom... any number of things can play a part.

    I supplement my hens' layer mash with kelp meal, fish meal, calcium, and for the winter, cracked corn. I also add a couple hours of light to the coop in the morning. Since it isn't particularly cold where I am, they'll get to free-range as much as they want all winter. As near as I can tell, I only have 1 (out of 5) that ever takes a day off from laying, and that's only every 10 days or so.
     
  6. doublel

    doublel New Egg

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    Dec 8, 2007
    WY
    Sorry I have 2 leghorns and 2 red sex links that I bought as chicks on June 1. I also have 2 older hens that I have no idea how old they are, one is a rhode island red and a buff orpington.
     
  7. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    8 a week at this time of year, cooped up, in cold weather from 6 hens. Sounds good compared to my 10 girls giving me about 6 a week. My one laying leghorn gives me about 4 eggs a week... which is subsequently most the eggs!!! She is about 16 months old, looks terribly dirty, is losing feathers and still lays.... I bet the change in season and less rainging is leading to less eggs and "lack" of flavor. Although I thought store eggs were bland in how they weren't as "rich" in the yolks.
     

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