Egg Laying In Winter

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bulldog-girl, May 30, 2008.

  1. bulldog-girl

    bulldog-girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 16, 2008
    Estacada, OR
    What do you guys do so that the girls will continue to lay in winter? Lights on timers in the hen house? Heat lamps? LED lamps? A heater in general so they are warm? Any suggestions would be great. I would like ours to lay in winter as long as possible.
     
  2. mmajw

    mmajw Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 31, 2008
    Maine
    I have a timer for the light and I also got a UV bulb so it was more like the sun. I also have a heater for the water so they have constant water.
     
  3. bigzio

    bigzio Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 20, 2007
    Wisconsin
    Hens need 14 hours of light to be at the optimum laying ability. One can use a variety of lights to obtain this goal.

    I know from experience that a red heat lamp will provide the light needed for egg laying and the heat it provides, keeping combs from freezing, for a win, win situation.

    I use a timer for the light when spring nears, changing the bulb from heat lamps to regular bulbs, when only the additional light is needed.

    bigzio
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    In part it depends on breed. My brown sex-links scarcely missed a beat during wintertime (and we get *really* short days up here!) despite zero additional lighting. Virtually an egg per day per hen.

    I have heard it rather persuasively argued that it is not necessarily good for the hen, though, to 'push' them in the winter with artificial lighting, for several reasons. Of course if you're In Production and will stew hens when laying drops off that may not be as big of a consideration, but otherwise it is something to think about.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  5. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

    My ridiculous opinion is NOT to use a light...because it may shorten your birds' lifespans.

    Penny laid all through the winter with only a couple of stops for broodiness and moulting.
    Obelisk started laying in November her first year and went all the way through to July before stopping for a moult. She's 5 now, as of Monday, and will lay from March to July.
     

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