Egg Laying/not laying & what's the correct feed

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by PolishChickMama, Jan 18, 2019.

  1. PolishChickMama

    PolishChickMama Chirping

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    Question about egg laying. I'm fairly new to having chickens (will be 1 year in March). We have 2 polish hens. They started laying in September 2018 and stopped laying in October 2018. We figured it was because the days had started to get shorter and/or they were molting. When should we expect our girls to start laying again? Should we be worried since they still aren't laying? Should I put the fake eggs (golf balls) back in the next boxes (I took them out after they started laying). Also, we have continued to feed them the layer feed all through this winter even after they stopped laying - is that ok? Thank you for any advice you can give!
     
  2. nchls school

    nchls school Crowing

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    My polish hens haven't laid in a couple months. I continue with the layer mash as I have other breeds that are laying. We also feed house scrapes and some multi grains. The polish hens will start laying again in the spring. My half polish are laying; much better than the pure breed ever did. Oddly, my half polish are crossed with phoenix, another breed not known to be prolific egg layers.
     
  3. Hens will stop laying in the winter and their production drops while they are molting; Polish are mainly ornamental breeds and they naturally are not very productive layers. Your hens will probably begin laying once they finish their molt and once the weather warms; feeding them layer feed throughout the season is fine as long as you offer other foods such as occasional vegetable treats. Good luck!
     
  4. PolishChickMama

    PolishChickMama Chirping

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    Thank you very much, this was very reassuring. We are fine getting no eggs, as they are really just a bonus for us - we wanted the girls just as pets mainly. I just wanted to make sure they should still NOT be laying and that the feed we were still giving them was ok. We give them a bounty of fresh fruits, veggies and scraps at least 5 out of 7 days a week so hopefully we are supplementing the layer feed properly. And, BOY, they get so excited to see me coming with their tray of treats! I LOVE IT!!! A few examples of their SPOILDNESS are attached. Thank you again for your advice! 44775.jpg IMG-2430.JPG
     
  5. PolishChickMama

    PolishChickMama Chirping

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    Thank you very much!
     
  6. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    Non layers don't need layer feed. I feed a Grower/Finisher and supply Oyster shell in a separate bowl when laying.
     
    Aceoky likes this.
  7. nchls school

    nchls school Crowing

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    Quite true. Laying mash can be used though; especially if there are other laying birds present; as in my flock.
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    No I feed it all the time. I never feed layer.
     
    Aceoky likes this.
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Ditto Dat^^^
    This works great for a mixed age flock...only the layers partake of the oyster shell.
    Excess calcium intake can damage liver and kidneys over long term.

    You are actually reducing their nutrition with all the treats, especially if feeding layer feed ration which is usually lower in protein(~16%). Keep treats to less than 10% volume of ration consumed daily. Feed them nothing but the layer for a week to figure out how much they normally eat daily.

    That said...the info above from folks with polish affirms what I thought about them not be prolific layers. They probably wouldn't have molted at that age...but maybe.

    ETA: I wonder if polish are not prolific layers because that top knot interferes with the light absorption by the pineal gland located behind the skull just above the eyes?
     
  10. nchls school

    nchls school Crowing

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    [QUOTE="aart, post:
    ETA: I wonder if polish are not prolific layers because that top knot interferes with the light absorption by the pineal gland located behind the skull just above the eyes?[/QUOTE]

    It would be interesting to know. Another possibility is that the breed was bred for looks only. Laying large amount of eggs isn't natural but a trait that is bred into a breed. Just as broodiness is a trait that is bred out so more eggs are laid. Odd though, polish rarely brood.

    I have several polish/phoenix pullets. They are laying every day. Phoenix are not great layers either so it will be interesting to see if the cross birds continue to lay so well.
     

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