Egg laying, safe to eat eggs.... more questions from a new egg finder.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Mehpenn, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. Mehpenn

    Mehpenn Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 1, 2011
    Gastonia, NC
    I doubt any of you remember me, but my family got six chicks back in April/May. Our intention was to get three, but we had to get six, so we rehomed three of them and are left with three. One RIR, two production reds.

    The chicks free range, mostly roost in the barn at night.

    Friday night, I went out to the barn to move some hay from our hay stall into the tack room and found seven eggs. They were on a pile of hay, just inside the door, behind a pallet that had been propped up to keep the horse out of the hay.

    I picked them up, carried them to the house to show my uber excited husband, but we decided to not eat them, since I have absolutely no idea how long they'd been there. The last time I was in the hay stall was about three weeks ago, so as far as I know whichever hen it was could have been adding to her pile over a three week period.

    Anyway, I was sick Saturday, so DH fed the horse and didn't check for eggs in the hay stall. But Sunday (yesterday) evening when I went to feed the horse, I checked and found two more eggs.

    She could have laid them Saturday? One Saturday, one Sunday? I have no idea.

    I know, bad egg keeping on my part.

    So, this morning when I went down to do my barn chores, I checked and no more eggs. So, when I go to put the horse back up in a couple hours, I'll check again.

    I like that she/they are laying in the hay as it makes it easier to find the eggs.... aside from the prosepect of attracting snakes.

    But, DH was asking me this morning.... how long can eggs lay in the hay before they're no longer safe to eat? If they're there a day, would they make us sick? Or am I going to be checking for eggs all day long to make sure I get them up while they're fresh?
     
  2. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the first batch you found, I wouldn't have eaten either, but would have scrambled them up and fed them back to the girls...they LOVE them...

    The newer ones, eat them, they are fine. If the temps are moderate, the eggs are fine. I would only worry if they eggs were sitting in heat for a long time,
    like your first bunch you found.

    Do you have nesting boxes for the girls? I had an issue with mine making secret nests. I started keeping them locked in the coop for a few extra hours, now they
    get the hint and lay in the boxes.

    Your eggs will be fine for quite a few days outside...if in doubt you can do the gloat test, if they sink they are fresh and good to eat, if they float, they go back to the
    girls in a breakfast omelet!
     
  3. chefchick

    chefchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 2, 2011
    I wouldn't eat the first ones you found...(I would scramble those up for your hens.. they love them) the second two should be okay unless it has been overly hot where you live. Can you talk hubby into making you some nest boxes so you can get your girls to lay there? It sure would make things easier for you!

    haha ... just checking back on this thread and it looks like I was typing my replay the same time as the above poster...[​IMG] I assure you, I didn't copy [​IMG] so, must be it's good advice, lol
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011
  4. jtbrown

    jtbrown Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Something as simple as a hay lined box (cardboard even) where they have been laying with a golfball or fake egg in it so they see where they are supposed to lay. Also, an old milk crate makes good nest, keeps them from kicking the eggs out of nest as they nest in it. It doesn't have to be anything fancy or expensive, or even something made. An old drawer from a dresser or even a laundry basket works well too

    I would not have eaten the first batch, would not have hesitated second batch. I have never had any float, but found one buried in bedding I didn't feel brave enough to try. It sank, so it was probably newer, but I gave it to girls scrambled. If it floats I would toss it down drain or disposal or in trash, worried that whatever made it float could be bad for the chicks.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011
  5. Mehpenn

    Mehpenn Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 1, 2011
    Gastonia, NC
    Thanks so much!!!

    DH is working on finishing the coop and run, which will contain nesting boxes. I know, I know, I've been saying that for months. But he works in the roofing sales industry and with those massive lines of hail storms we had in our area, his work days have been long, long and longer, working six days a week.
    Anywho, the actual coop is finished, just need it fenced in with the nesting boxes put in. Wonder if I could go ahead and put the nesting boxes out there and see if the girls will use them?
     
  6. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    just make sure the nesting boxes are about 18 " or so off the ground and that the roosts for them to sleep on, are higher...chickens go to the highest point, and if that is the boxes, they will sleep there, and poop there....

    Good luck!
     
  7. dbounds10

    dbounds10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anytime you find eggs and are not sure how old they are, place them in a large bowl or pan of water. If they float, either toss them or feed them back to the girls (cooked). If they sink, they are still good and perfectly safe to eat.
     
  8. kizanne

    kizanne Chillin' With My Peeps

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    unless you have a lot of really hot weather don't worry about the age just the float and the smell. In many countries eggs are never refridgerated and lasts one to two weeks easy.
     

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