Egg Question

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by countrygirl911, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. countrygirl911

    countrygirl911 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2010
    Mississippi
    Hi i have a few questions about gatherins and selling the eggs i was wondering do you was the eggs if so cold or hot water, also do you store them in the fridge or on the counter which one helps them last longer because i want to save up a few dozen before selling and was wondering how long they keep for. Also how much should one sell a dozen eggs for and a half dozen eggs for
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    I don't wash my eggs that I keep for my family's use until just before I'm ready to use them. Washing eggs removes the bloom. The bloom is a coating the hen puts on her eggs at the end of the laying process. It seals out dirt and germs.
    I also don't wash eggs that I sell and my customers know to wash them before using.
    When you wash eggs you should do so in warm water, at least 20 degrees or so hotter than the egg itself. Washing in cold water is a big no-no. Using cold water causes the contents of the egg to contract, pulling dirt and germs into the egg. Warm water causes the contents to expand, pushing dirt and germs up and away from the contents. You should also never soak eggs in water.
    Eggs last longer if kept refrigerated. I recall reading an article that said eggs left on the counter for one day age the equivalent of one week in the frig.
    I can't really tell you what the local going rate is for a dozen eggs. All my egg customers are either very good neighbors and/or police officers and firefighters that my DH works with, so I sell to them at a discount. It's enough to buy feed for my hens and that's all I care about.
    The usual going rate would vary depending on where you live.
     
  3. Ms Chirps' Chooks

    Ms Chirps' Chooks Out Of The Brooder

    This excellent short article on washing eggs for eating rather than hatching is published by Nebraska Extension #G1724.

    It says to first wash in water temperature of 90 to 120 degrees for 30 seconds. The contents of the egg will expand and 'push' out any invading microbes. Then sanitize in mild bleach solution of 1 tablespoon bleach to 1 gallon water, then rinse and refrigerate with large end up.

    Egg Cleaning Procedures for the Backyard Flock

    http://elkhorn.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=798

    Hope this helps!
    Ms Chirp
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    115
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Ms Chirps' Chooks :

    This excellent short article on washing eggs for eating rather than hatching is published by Nebraska Extension #G1724.

    It says to first wash in water temperature of 90 to 120 degrees for 30 seconds. The contents of the egg will expand and 'push' out any invading microbes. Then sanitize in mild bleach solution of 1 tablespoon bleach to 1 gallon water, then rinse and refrigerate with large end up.

    Egg Cleaning Procedures for the Backyard Flock

    http://elkhorn.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=798

    Hope this helps!
    Ms Chirp

    The only problem with that is that by washing the eggs you are removing the bloom. Without the bloom you have to be more vigilant about using the eggs quickly. With the bloom intact, they can last months.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/1977-11-01/Fresh-Eggs.aspx
     
  5. briteday

    briteday Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 16, 2008
    Northern NV
    I make a big effort to keep our nest boxes clean. Since our new pullets are just starting to roost in the hen coop I go out each evening and put buckets in the nest boxes so none of them chooses to sleep (and poop!) in a nest. I also check each morning when I open the pop door that the bedding is clean, and re-fill as necessary so the eggs don't break. I rarely get a dirty egg.
     

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