egg size, is it dictated by Mother's egg size?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by jerrybeans, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. jerrybeans

    jerrybeans Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 13, 2009
    Harrison
    Hi, I have a 1 year old buff americana, her eggs are small, no where near as large as others I have seen, from her breed. If I breed her, will her offspring also produce small eggs? THX
     
  2. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    May 25, 2007
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    Not necessarily. There are a few things that determine the egg size. Genetics are only a small part of it. The two big ones are the weight of the hen when she started laying and how much protein she is getting.

    Was she an early layer? Was she smaller than your other birds when she started laying? Is she smaller than the other birds now?

    Is she getting enough food and water, or is she having to compete for it? Is she otherwise healthy with a full coat of feathers and no worms?
     
  3. jerrybeans

    jerrybeans Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 13, 2009
    Harrison
    Hi, thanks for your reply. I purchased her when she was about 7 or 8 months old. So, I am unable to answer in regards to when she started laying and amounts of protein and if she was an early layer. Her size appears good in comparison to her coop mates, buff orpingtons and barred plymouth rocks. Thanks
     
  4. Sparklee

    Sparklee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2008
    Quote:Agree with Mac as to protein. Limiting amino acid methionine is the main issue according to one study I read. Fish or other animal proteins are usually the best source.

    Size of hen at time of first egg, as mentioned by Mac, is also key.

    "Achieving the proper pullet body weight is the first step in maintaining good early egg size
    Underweight pullets are one of the most common causes for small early eggs. It is known that underweight pullets produce more small eggs early in the production cycle. "
    From http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/pou3651

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    feed with animal source of protein may help. Warmth, keeping her warm so energy/protein is used for egg production. If she's missing feathers, it's very difficult to stay warm, plus she will keep using the protein she eats to grow new feathers instead of producing eggs. Not too many snacks that dilute the level of protein that she's getting in the feed.
     

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