Egg yolk peritonitis treatment

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by critterfixer, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. critterfixer

    critterfixer New Egg

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    Jan 26, 2013
    Oregon
    Hello,
    I am new to the "flock". I love this forum. I found you all while researching and positively diagnosing an issue with my little hen. I want to thank you all for that and now need advice on how far to continue. My girl has been DE wormed, placed on a round of electrolytes, I have performed the draining of her abdomen and over a two day period, I slowly removed approximately 600 ccs from her. (I didn't want to do this all at once for fear of sending her into shock) I used sterile equipment and an aseptic technique so as not to cause sepsis. The good news is that she has perked up, pinked up and is eating and pooping again and regaining her strength! The bad news is that when I drained her final fluid, a large egg shaped mass became clearly visible under her skin. It is free moving and feels very much like a calcified egg! How could an egg be deposited into the abdomen AFTER calcification? I believe this is impossible since calcification takes place lower in the reproductive tract. So it is either a very turgid and tough membranous egg, or a neoplasia (cancer). Has anybody seen this before? Am I possibly misdiagnosing? Is there anybody out there who has had a peritonitis resorb and end up with a healthy hen? She is in the house now and on tetracycline. Is there anything else I can do for her? I hate to euthanize her now that she is responding to treatment, but if this is indeed a calcified egg or a neoplasia, she is likely to become septic anyway right? I guess I am looking for support and any experiences or advice anybody might have would be helpful. P.S if anybody ever has to "tap" a chicken, the procedure was actually quite simple and I would be happy to walk you through it.
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    The material deposited in the peritoneum can be quite hard in itself. Without surgery, there is really no way to be certain what it is. Internal laying, by the way, is another term for this condition, in case you haven't run across that.

    DE taken internally will not kill worms, but I don't think many would recommending worming her with anything stronger at this point.

    Here are some links to some material posted by people who have dealt with this:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/362422/drained-a-hens-abdomen-rest-in-peace-olivia-11-5-10

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...bout-what-i-found-after-necropsy#post_9863006

    Post #3 in the second link has some more links that may be helpful to you.
     
  3. critterfixer

    critterfixer New Egg

    9
    0
    7
    Jan 26, 2013
    Oregon
    thank you!
     

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