Egg yolk Peritonitis

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by The Blue Egg Gal, Apr 2, 2018.

  1. The Blue Egg Gal

    The Blue Egg Gal In the Brooder

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    Do hens ever recover from egg yolk peritonitis? fluid was removed a week ago, and given antibiotics had no other symptoms of illness, seems to be doing well but now small amount of fluid has now returned. Is recover possible or just a matter of time...
     
    calichicken likes this.
  2. calichicken

    calichicken Crowing

    My little hen who had this issue at 3 1/2 years old would have periodical bouts of symptoms. Started out with fluid build up that we drained every 4 months, treated with antibiotics and she would be ok for another 3 months or so. Healthy, running around, ect. But after a year....the fluid build up was more frequent. Sadly, she passed away a year ago in January. So for my girl, the symptoms could be treated for a while, but ultimately she passed away. I do have to say, she was comfortable and happy up until the last bout...then she was sick and passed away quickly. Good luck with your girl. :hugs
     
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  3. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    The fluid drainage is simply that. The yolks that have been laid internally remain inside the abdominal cavity and if she continues to ovulate which they often do, the mass of yolks inside her gets bigger. Fluid build up will usually reoccur and can be drained at regular intervals but the mass of egg yolks can only be removed by very risky and expensive surgery. Eventually she will die either from an infection or her gut will become constricted by the mass of yolks or she will suffer heart or respiratory failure from the fluid build up. Hormonal implants every 3-6 months will prevent ovulation, so the mass of yolks doesn't increase but there is no way for the existing yolks to be removed other than via surgery. They can often sit their quite benignly for months without becoming infected, but each time she is drained the risk of introducing an infection is possible.
    The fluid (ascites) is simply a symptom of the underlying problem which is internal laying (egg yolk peritonitis is when an infection occurs in those yolks in the abdomen) and draining just alleviates that symptom, but it will build up again. Usually it is a matter or weeks rather than months. Learning to drain her yourself at home reduces the financial cost but you are only delaying the inevitable.
    Hormonal implants run at somewhere between $100-$150 a go I believe.
     
  4. calichicken

    calichicken Crowing

    Well said @rebrascora ! My.girl was never a regular layer to begin with so she would have periods with no issues because she didn't lay at that time. The last time we drained the fluid is when infection set in and we lost her.:( Thankfully it was quickly so she didn't suffer! We never considered any type of surgical treatments even though she was a pet for us because from what I researched, hens do not fair well with these procedures.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2018
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  5. The Blue Egg Gal

    The Blue Egg Gal In the Brooder

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    Thank you for your response, so sorry for you loss not looking forward to that day & what to do with her when that time comes again. The vet is pretty pricey if I continue to drain her but was double the price to put her to sleep! I just couldn't do it yet when she is still bright eyed & active Hope when the time comes she will pass in her sleep
     
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  6. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    So sorry you are facing this. I think they eventually succumb unless you catch it early and can provide regular hormone implants to prevent laying. I lost a hen to this in September after several avian vet visits, intensive care, antibiotics, draining and hormone implants. In the end, I think a respiratory infection had set in, as she was gurgling. I do regret that last attempt to save her, as it was a dramatic and traumatic death. I hope when the time comes, you have the strength to have her put down if she is suffering. You will probably know when it’s time. So sorry. She may have some happy months left in her until then. Enjoy her. I made sure to cherish every cute little thing about my girl those last few months.
     
  7. The Blue Egg Gal

    The Blue Egg Gal In the Brooder

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    Sorry for your loss My little girl was a great layer her first year, then became less frequent & Pretty much stoped Laying by last june, then went into an early molt & never Lay again now 8 months later she must of had a hormones surge when the other hens started laying again resulting in her egg yolk peritonitis. wishing there was something more I can do to delay the inevitable for now I try to reduce the amount of light by keeping her longer in the coop in the mornings, hoping it reduces her ovulation and the ascites returning.
     
  8. The Blue Egg Gal

    The Blue Egg Gal In the Brooder

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    Thank you sorry for your loss
     
  9. The Blue Egg Gal

    The Blue Egg Gal In the Brooder

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    Thank you for all the info! if there is another trip to the vet I hope she'll show me how to drain her my self & that's if I am able to do the procedure
     
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  10. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    It truly matters how far you wish to go for her. Younger hens in early stages of peritonitis can recover, but only with very invasive surgery to remove any egg materials and hysterectomy or annual / biannual hormone implants (which will range from $200+ each depending on your vet... my hen was large enough to need two every six months). The surgery can be successful but will likely run you at least $1,000 if done by a skilled avian vet. My last hen that had this lived to be 6.... we did do vent flushes at the vet with her to remove and break up loose egg material and to make her comfortable (this wasn't a solution, it just allowed her to live more comfortably in her final months), as she was not a good surgery candidate.
     

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