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Eggs are getting smaller.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by farmerinKC, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. farmerinKC

    farmerinKC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2011
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    My five Golden Comets have been laying for about six weeks now and at first they were mostly cute tiny eggs-then they got much bigger-at least large to extra large size.

    The past week it seems like they are almost all medium size. Does anyone else have varying size eggs? Do I need to add something to their food? [​IMG]
     
  2. farmerinKC

    farmerinKC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2011
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Could it be that I have stopped giving them yogurt as their treat? Maybe they need more protein?
     
  3. 3goodeggs

    3goodeggs pays attention sporadically

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    It may be protein, or shorter days, or worms.
    let's see what everyone else says.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Likely a few things, but try this. Change your feed to a 20% flock raiser type feed for one bag. Yes, it costs a buck or two more, but I got a feeling the egg size will increase. While you don't say, you are likely feeding a standard 16% protein layer formula?

    If you are ration feeding, rather than free feeding, up their portion, especially the mid afternoon portion. Another couple ounces per bird.

    Or, if you have a dozen extra eggs, crack them into a pail and stir in 4 cups of their feed. Within a day or two, if their egg size increases, which I believe it will, you'll have the answer to your question about more protein. Sex links are genetically disposed to needing "better" feed than a heritage breed. The RSLs are great producers, but have high protein feed needs to achieve this laying.
     
  5. farmerinKC

    farmerinKC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2011
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Thank you Fred's Hens for your reply. I was completely out of feed yesterday-so made the 20 mile trip to buy some-unfortunately I hadn't asked the question about the protein yet.

    Sorry, I didn't first tell what I had been feeding.

    I have been giving them Nutrena Nature Wise 18% Starter Grower crumbles ever since they finished the first bag of medicated. Their feed is available to them at all times. I had not switched to layer feed yet, because I still have 2 EEs and 2 BOs that have not started laying yet-so I bought some oyster shell-and have offered it in a bowl free choice.

    So, yesterday I almost bought 22% Game Bird feed-but the Nutrena 18% crumbles were on sale so I bought a bag of that and a bag of 16% layer crumbles-that I thought I would mix in when all of them have started to lay. I guess I should have gone ahead and bought the Game Bird 22%-because when I start mixing the two together I will be lowering the protein. [​IMG]

    Or, if you have a dozen extra eggs, crack them into a pail and stir in 4 cups of their feed. Within a day or two, if their egg size increases, which I believe it will, you'll have the answer to your question about more protein. Sex links are genetically disposed to needing "better" feed than a heritage breed. The RSLs are great producers, but have high protein feed needs to achieve this laying.

    I will try the eggs-and that's good to know about the RSLs higher protein needs.

    The reason I stopped giving them yogurt is because it's expensive-now that they are bigger they can really gobble it down. I had read on here about how much chickens like scratch-so last time at the feed store I bought a 50# bag for about $10.00-so eliminating the yogurt and giving scratch instead probably wasn't a good idea.

    Thank you again for your help. There is lots to learn about these chickens!​
     

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