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eggs without shell

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jillcg, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. jillcg

    jillcg Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a red star, that started laying about 4 weeks ago. First eggs were normal, after 2 weeks she started laying eggs without shell, but membrane around. I took her of the kitchen scrabs and gave her just the pellets. After 3 more eggs without shell, she started laying normal again. Now, 2 weeks later, it is starting all over again. For 2 days, eggs with membrane, but no shell. Is there any reason to be concerned that there is something wrong? She looks absolutely fine. Yesterdays, the no shell egg had two egg yolks.
    Can she maybe not produce calcium fast enough? Should I feed all my chickens oyster shells or anything in addition? Can I feed kitchen scrabs (just vegetables and fruit) or should I not give them any at all?
     
  2. peopleRanimals2

    peopleRanimals2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is an easy fix. Provide all of your chickens with oyster shells. (They will eat them as they need them, just like grit.) Also, younger hens that have just started laying haven't gotten into a routine yet, and odd eggs are normal. Even after she's laying regularly, you may still get an odd egg. Lastly, make sure that she is on a laying feed. (A feed meant for laying hens. There are different kinds of feed for chicks, pullets, and layers.) Kitchen scraps are ok, in moderation. And always feed them to your chickens after they have had their food out for a while, so that they still eat their food. And provide grit if you don't already. Hope this was helpful!
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  3. docrox12

    docrox12 Out Of The Brooder

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    I think I had one hen do the same thing yesterday. Is that what is in this picture? It wasn't in the nesting box but on the poop board.
    .[​IMG]
     
  4. peopleRanimals2

    peopleRanimals2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's just an odd egg. Hens that just started laying's bodies are not used to producing eggs yet, and this should stop if you provide them with oyster shells and layer feed. you may want to put a fake egg, or something like a golf ball in the nest box to encourage them to lay in it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  5. docrox12

    docrox12 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. They are laying in the nesting boxes. Just this crazy one on the poop board in the morning!
     
  6. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    While shell-less eggs *can* be indicative of a calcium deficiency, it is not always the case and adding calcium supplements is not a guaranteed "fix". For new layers it is more an issue of all the "moving parts" on the egg assembly line figuring out how to work together to build an egg. When you understand all that goes into constructing that one little egg it is amazing it ever happens, let alone several times a week. New layers frequently produce eggs without complete shells and it is not uncommon to find them outside of the nest box given that they often "skip" the shell gland step which means they are expelled during the roosting hours and/or seem to "surprise" the hen with their arrival. You can add all the calcium in the world and still have shell-less eggs when the issue is the shell gland not kicking in on shchedule.
    That said, proper calcium is important - it is not necessary to feed a "layer" feed, as long as you provide sufficient calcium outside of the feed you do choose. Many people prefer the increased protein content and "all age/sex safe" option of using a grower ration for all their birds and then offering the calcium in the form of oyster shell on the side.
     
  7. docrox12

    docrox12 Out Of The Brooder

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    My plan is to soon do a mix of Corn, Wheat, field oats and fish meal soaked overnight then fed. Along with crushed egg shells and veggie scraps. They also free range.
    Thanks so much for the info.
    Now if you can glance at my poop post, that would be great!
     
  8. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Giving crushed egg shell is fine, but is unsuitable as a sole source of calcium in support of healthy layers as it is not able to be efficiently absorbed and used. Also, remember that a key component in the absorption of calcium is sufficient Vitamin D
     
  9. peopleRanimals2

    peopleRanimals2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2. Also, oyster shells are really good for them, providing calcium and minerals.
     
  10. docrox12

    docrox12 Out Of The Brooder

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    Got it. I will add it. Thanks guys.
     

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