Electric fence

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Amina, Dec 7, 2014.

  1. Amina

    Amina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a coop and run that I am confident is secure against predators like foxes and racoons, but lately there has been a feral dog hanging around our house, about the size of a lab (haven't been able to get a super good look at it because it runs as soon as it sees people). It has me a little insecure about my setup... I mean, it *should* be okay... but then again, my next-door neighbor has had dogs tear through hardware cloth with no problem, and kill her rabbits.

    So I'm thinking of adding some electric fence around my coop and run area as an added layer of protection. My question is, how do I pick something that would be effective against large dogs? I have never set up an electric fence before, so I'm not sure what I'm doing.

    Is this a good choice for a charger?
    http://www.amazon.com/Fi-Shock-EAC1...qid=1418008077&sr=8-1&keywords=electric+fence

    Should I go with a pulsing kind instead? Like this?
    http://www.amazon.com/Zareba-A15-Po...kmr3&keywords=electric+fence++charger+pulsing
     
  2. vbob99

    vbob99 Out Of The Brooder

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    you definitely want a pulse kind. continuous flow can cause death of smaller animals and short your system. If you have a farm store near go in and talk to them, TSC, COOP, ect

    the one you listed should work though, dont go with lower range/output.
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    How the fencing is setup also important and that will be a function of your coop design. Show a picture of your setup.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2014
  4. Amina

    Amina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here are a few pics of right after we built it... it's still the same except that the gap under the coop has been fllled in with rocks, and the top of the run has been covered in corrugated metal sheeting. I also keep that log in the corner of the pic propped up against the door of the run for a little more low-tech security. I figure all doors are potential weak points.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Here's the back of the coop, which is kept locked.
    [​IMG]


    Anyway, I figure I could put four t-posts a foot or two away from the whole coop/run setup, in a rectangle, and then put the hot wire on that?
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2014
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Good Idea. I suggest 3 or even four strands around perimeter at roughly 6" intervals with lowest about 4" above ground. You will then be able to repel smaller critters like opossums and raccoons where latter might challenge your latches.
     
  6. vbob99

    vbob99 Out Of The Brooder

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    if this is going to be your permanent coop and run i would recommend you do a little more work. your run needs bracing, make a y from each corner post up to the top board the brace should be about 3ft long, you should be able to shake a post and all of them shake a little not the one shaking a lot when done. brace your door with 1 by or 2 by to help insure predators cant simply rip the plywood apart to get in.

    t post idea is sound but you may need 8 depending on how far apart they are and how much sag you end up with in you fence. I usually place my fence about 2in high on the coop/run to prevent digging, but a fence may work. i would worry about this though

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Bf6Dm3Uy6mc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  7. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    I am going to suggest that you move the fence further out from the coop, you may want to enjoy easier access to the area between the fence and your coop for things like cutting the grass or making repairs and improvements.

    Remember that the closer a predator can get to your coop, the more that predator can already TASTE the succilenst chicken tenders standing on the opposite side of the fence.
     
  8. Amina

    Amina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are likely to move within 6 months to a year, so I hesitate to put in major work to the coop and run. Anything I add, I would prefer for it to be relatively easy to take down and transport to a new place (so I like the idea of electric fence). All structures must be removed from the property when we leave, which is already going to suck. The run has to be torn down at that time, and I'm not sure if we will take the coop with us or not. I am building a new one that will be more portable, but that will take some time.

    That's a good point about putting the fence a little further back for ease of mowing. The reason I was first thinking of it being so close is that if a dog barged through the fence in his excitement to get to the chickens, he would be repeatedly zapped because there's not much room to maneuver between the fence and coop. The only way to stop getting zapped is to leave the area. Whereas if there is more space in between, then it's maybe more likely that an animal gets zapped once, and then is left alone to chew and paw at the coop/run without further zapping until he wants to leave. I'm not sure how likely this scenario is though. Any thoughts on what is better?
     
  9. vbob99

    vbob99 Out Of The Brooder

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    see youtube video above or search youtube for "raccoons vineyard electric"
    if you want portable get the smaller rebar posts instead of t-posts
     
  10. Gerard Dawn

    Gerard Dawn Out Of The Brooder

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    Fencing is very important for protecting your livestock such as chickens. If you want to put an electric fence what I do is first build a wall using blocks let's say I meter high, then we have a normal fence, then right on top we install the electric fence.

    This helps in that children or your chickens won't be electrocuted.

    All the best!
     

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