Electric Fencing doorways?? Totally new with this need advice.

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by babychickfarmer, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. babychickfarmer

    babychickfarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    We are hanging up the electric fencing up today and we have two door ways that we need to put those yellow things you grab and you can move the wire. We need help we have no idea how toi install these and we can't seem to find anywhere on the net to help. Any advice.

    we are totally new to the electric fencing thing.. [​IMG]

    do you have to have two to connect to eachother for each string or is it one and it connects too a loop or what??


    PLEASE HELP.
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Ok, this is easy, you can do it [​IMG] First let me explain how to do the connection; then make sure you read the important note about 'which direction' to install it, b/c otherwise you will zap yourself a lot by accident [​IMG]

    If this is a short and poorly tensioned fence you can just use regular plastic insulators on either side of the doorway. See if there's any way that your yellow gatehandle will hook onto the insulator already (it depends entirely on what kind of insulator you're using). If it will, cool. If not, twist out a little loop of wire at the end of the fencewire where the gate will latch, to give the handle something to hook onto.

    OTOH if there is significant tension on the fencewire, then go to your farm store and buy the kind of insulator designed for gateway openings. It screws into the wood, has a plastic insulating collar, and one or two metal loops that your yellow gatehandle hooks onto. Use one of those on each side of the gateway (per fencewire -- so if you have two fencewires, you will need a total of 4 of these insulators).

    To create the gate, attach a length of fencewire to the electrified fence wire on what will be the 'hinge' side of the gate (SEE BELOW). Make sure it is a good electrical connection. Or if you're just running the fencewire now, you can wind it securely several times 'round that insulator (to hold the fence tension) then leave enough extra length beyond that to cross the door gap.

    Now poke the end of that thru the hole in the metal piece at the butt of the gatehandle, stretch it across and hook the gatehandle in place, then pull the fencewire taut til the spring in the gatehandle stretches out some. (This will keep the gate wire taut). Now just twist it 'round and 'round itself to keep it at that length. Presto [​IMG] To use the door, unhook the wire and go thru. To reelectrify it, hook it back onto the loop on that insulator so the fence connection is once again complete.

    AVOID SURPRIZE ZAPS:

    The smart way to do it is so that the gate wire is UNelectrified when it is open (unhooked). This means that the gatehandle end should be CLOSEST to the charger, and the 'hinge' end will be the one further from the charger. (You have your fence set up as just a line of wire, not a full connected loop, right? Don't set it up as an electrically-connected loop. For a variety of reasons).

    Note that this means that when the gatehandle is unhooked, all of the fence 'downstream' of that gatehandle is nonelectrified. If this is acceptible, then fine. If it is not acceptible, then you will need to make two modifications. 1) trench electric wire (using double-insulated electric wire cable, NOT household insulated cable) underneath the doorway and connect it to the fencewire on the far side of the doorway. Now the far end of the fencewire stays electrified no matter what you do with the gatehandle. But you should also 2) attach the 'hinge' end of the gate onto A SEPARATE, DEAD INSULATOR (not wired into the rest of the fence at all) so that when you unhook the gatehandle, that bit of wire is dead and won't 'bite' you [​IMG]

    Darn, I wish I could just draw you a sketch because the above makes it sound much more complicated than it is. Basically, the gatehandle acts as a disconnectable link in the fencewire (I actually use gatehandles to turn on/off sections of fenceline for rotational grazing [​IMG]), and you want to make sure the gate wire itself is unelectrified when it's unhooked.

    Hope this helps some,

    Pat
     
  3. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    google install electric fence or go to afence.com They have almost all the answers there, plus diagrams of how to do it.
     

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