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electric fencing

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kayleyl, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. kayleyl

    kayleyl New Egg

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    Mar 29, 2016
    Franklinton NC
    I saw that there are items for electric fencing on this site. Can I use that to keep chickens in? I have a horse pasture (currently empty) that I could lower the fencing on to keep chickens in. I would be concerned about there being to much power for the chickens
     
  2. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2010
    NEK, VT
    It's not too much power. Depending on what size charger you get for fence will determine the max possible volt delivered (shock) when touched. None of those will cause injury. My birds learned to respect the fence within few hours. They know not to touch it. Wildlife will also be trained not to go near the fence in quick order too. That's how they work for containment and predator protection. All animals are quickly trained to respect the fence, land predators stay away. Deer can become entangled in fencing and can perish. Their prey instincts of quick death and constant charge. Use a easy to see fence and they'll leave it alone, wont even jump it after first shock. If your chickens are already trained to fly over fencing then electric wont work to contain them. If they grow up with electric they wont attempt to fly over it.

    Premier1 or Kencove are good companies to get fencing from. I use a 4' high X 164' net with hotgate. The charger is Patriot P5 which is a .5 joule charger- delivers 5-6K volt. A P10 or 1 joule can deliver up to 8K volt. The voltage is determined by how much the fence it grounding out, will sag over time and if not tightened up ground on weeds and lose power. Longer fences need the larger charger to counter inherent grounding. You need 1 ground rod for .5 joule charger and two for a 1 joule. No need for larger charger than that. I'm getting a 1 joule charger to protect beehives this year from bear. They require over 6 K volts. Some goats need that much charge too but most everything else will get sufficient shock 4-6K. Premier1 sells as kit the charger that will include a ground rod and fence tester. It's cheaper to buy as kit and recommend the tester. Lets you know if the fence is grounding out too much. If it gets down to 3k you need to shift fence some to mow grass or it wont be effective. The fencing comes as kit too which includes 4 sturdier posts for corners. They are handy in aiding to tighten up the fence. Recommend Premier1 and the two kits. You choose the fence and length and charger but get both in kit to save cash. Hotgate is nice too.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016
  3. kayleyl

    kayleyl New Egg

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    Mar 29, 2016
    Franklinton NC
    I already have three strand fencing around about a 1/2 acre. Is there anything I can do with that or would I need the chicken netting. I was hoping I would be able to do about 5 inches off the ground and then maybe 7 and 7? I'm not sure what would be good if I was able to use the strands I already have. I don't have it in my budget to buy anything else for it, so I was hoping I could work with what I already have.
     
  4. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2010
    NEK, VT
    Strands wont keep chickens in. I suppose you could use any old chicken netting and put posts and strands of electric around that to keep predators out. That would work. Using what you have existing and only purchasing inexpensive poultry netting/fencing to contain the birds.
     

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