Electricity cost questions about incubators----110 vrs 220

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Cathlina, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. Cathlina

    Cathlina Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Texas Transplant
    Does anyone have both types of Incubators that run off of 110 and 220? I was wondering if anyone had done any research on the cost of them to run.
    I only have the GQF's but have found 2 of the larger ones that run off 220. I am concerened about the cost to run the larger type of bators. Mainly how efficient they are. I have been happy with my GQF's but need more room.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. mdbucks

    mdbucks Cooped Up

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    The amount of eletricity you use will be the same, with 220 you use less amp, but same amount of electricty

    Laymens terms:

    if you put 10 cups of water into a bucket you have 10 cups

    if you put 20 1/2 cups of bucket into a bucket you have 10 cups

    Just for higher draws such as a heating element in large bator, if it draws 30 amps on 110 you would need a large gauge wire, and most household cuircuts would trip(usually 15-25 amp) so you will have to have circuit set up just for bator.

    Now with 220 it will only draw 15 amps you can get away with smaller wire, but will be feeding elecricity on two wires(220 is actually 2 110's being feed at same time) again you will need special cuircut set up to supply because most houses only have 110 outlets except stove and dryer.

    This may be different in other countries I only speak from American Point of view.

    Did this help or confuse you more.
     
  3. Cathlina

    Cathlina Out Of The Brooder

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    Texas Transplant
    "Confuse me More?" [​IMG]


    I don't think thats possible, thats a constant state for me lately. Especially when it comes to anything electrical.
    I just don't want to get something that will cost so much more to use, but I can see it will hold many more eggs also.
    Wish I could just find some more GQF's locally.


    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  4. hart31

    hart31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bowbells, ND
    If the only difference was 110 vs 220 the cost should be the same.
    Theoretically a larger bator with more capacity should be more effecient but factors like the amount of insulation, how often you have to open the bator, space filled by eggs, vs empty airspace, etc. will make more difference.

    The biggest factor might be if you have the right 220 circuits available. If you have to hire an electrician to add a 220 circuit to your incubation & hatching room you might be talking a significant expense.
     
  5. mdbucks

    mdbucks Cooped Up

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    Quote:electricy wise it will cost no more to run a 220 vs 110 appliance, but as stated above if it cost you $100 to have wiring done, will it be worth it, also if you plan to hatch 10 eggs at a time, you may want to consider smaller bator, why not use the whole oven to make a piece of toast, because most of your power goes to heat the area that doesnt inclued bread, same concept her I think
     
  6. RepoBob

    RepoBob Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 25, 2007
    Illinois
    Maybe another way of say it:

    You are billed by the amount of watts you use
    Lets say the incubator takes 500 watts
    with 110v you would use about 5 amps
    with 220v you would use about 2.5 amps
    But you are still using 500 watts, which is what the power company measures.

    Hope that helps.
    Bob
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2008
  7. chickabator

    chickabator Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 30, 2007
    ky
    220 is like running your dryer for 21 days straight non stop. 110 is like a lamp that is kept on for 21 days. I would almost promise you the 110 is cheaper to run. turn your dryer on for a few minutes and look at your electric meter how fast it moves and then turn on a lamp by its self and you will definately see the difference.
     
  8. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Iceland
    Quote:Sorry, your not even close.


    They both use the same amount of power. Case closed. 120 is US & Canada.
    220 is for commercial applications or export to Europe and Africa.


    RepoBob & MD answered this accurately.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2008
  9. chickabator

    chickabator Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 30, 2007
    ky
    your right if that is what she is talking about but I have seen incubators in the US that run off of 220 and that is just like a dryer an electric stove and a hot water heater. Yes I know that over seas their 110 is 220 so if that is where they are talking about then I admit I am wrong that it uses the same but here in the US 220 is more it uses more wattage than a 110.
     
  10. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Quote:I'm not trying to debate you and I know your intentions are to help.

    This has already been covered but let me do a quick lesson.

    Voltage is electrical pressure
    Current (amps) is the amount of current (Sorta like water through a pipe)
    Wattage = volts * amps

    100 watts is 100 watts no matter what the voltage is.

    100 watts @ 120 volts = .83 amps
    100 watts @ 240 volts = .415 amps (smaller wire needed)
    Either way it is 100 watts

    Your dryer and oven run on 220 (actually 240) because it takes a smaller wire
    to deliver the same power. Just cause something is 220 doesn't mean i uses more
    or less energy. The picture tube in your TV uses up to 40,000 volts.


    I'm sure there are some bators (big, commercial ones) that run on 240VAC. But that is not
    what is going on here.


    Going back to the original post most bators use well under 100 watts, therefore cost less
    than $.50 per day to run.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2008

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