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Electro-net Fencing

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Fentress, Dec 17, 2013.

  1. Fentress

    Fentress Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just a reminder that although expensive it does work. I have not had a single loss to a four legged predator in 2 years. You do have to put in extra work to move the coop and fencing when your grass wears down, but it is a small price to pay to have safe, happy, and healthy birds. Of course, raptors are a different story, my experience is if you have a rooster that keeps a look out and a mature hawk wise flock your losses should be minimal. Here's the cost estimate for those interested.

    164 feet of the original 42 inch fencing - $150.00
    1/2 joule charger - $85.00
    extra posts, $4 a piece - $48.00
    deep cycle battery -$100.00

    total -$383.00

    I would upgrade to a 1 joule output charger for about $25 more dollars and that can easily charge two runs of fence ( 328 feet) even with a grass load on it. That would be almost 7,000 square feet of yard area.

    I'm not selling anything, I am just giving an example of how much it would cost to have some peace of mind. Let me know if you have any questions. Of course, you also have to have well made coops that can be moved.

    Mark
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    If you can manage to have 110-120 volt AC plug in charger you can reduce the cost by up to $100. Spend what you save on grounding rods and lighting arresters. You'll be happy you did.
     
  3. Fentress

    Fentress Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yes. My charger is AC/DC and I don't think it really cost much more for it to be compatible with both power sources. I have spoken to people who have stopped keeping chickens because of predator issues and others that seem despondent about the their future. It just doesn't have to be that way.
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I use the electric poultry netting in addition high-tensile wire. Some operates off A.C. outlet while balance operates off solar charger. Latter is much more flexible with respect to location. Combination works very well against most ground predators.
     
  5. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 600' of the netting from Premier, with the AC powered charger they offer(The Kube). I have had a lot of success with it also. No losses going on 2yrs. As far as having to have a easily movable coop, to have the netting, well that is not necessarily true. Unless you hook it to a sizable tractor, my coop ain't going nowhere. It has been in the same spot since it was built. But with 600' of netting I still, going on 2yrs, have plenty of grass in the safe area.


    [​IMG]
     
  6. Fentress

    Fentress Chillin' With My Peeps

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    that's a lot of fence! And yes, you don't have to move if you don't want to. Love that thicket you have in the middle of your pasture, I need to create something like that.
     
  7. jbravo54

    jbravo54 Out Of The Brooder

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    I love the electro fence as well, but a few problems. Something has still taken a couple of ours. I am thinking a fox jumped over, because I don't think a hawk can fly away with one. Also, my fence is partially buried in snow, so no juice going through the fence.
     
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Thicket need not be so tall. Ideal thick could also be realized with a blackberry / raspberry batch (brambles). Dense patches of timothy or brome grass can get you into good cover even quicker. I cut narrow strips through that allow easy penetration by chickens and ventilation during heat of day. Such patches and like JackE also provide refuge from heat as well as cold. That should not be overlooked.
     
  9. RoostersCrow HensDeliver!

    RoostersCrow HensDeliver! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The coop and fencing can be easily moved if you kept that in mind when building it, it takes me about two hours to move everything by myself IF I don't have to take the coop up to the house to fill up with water. I have 2 165' sections of electric net fencing from Farm Tek, a bunch of step-in posts, and 4 t-posts for the corners. I move it every month or my 100+ chickens would have no grass to graze and would tear up the filter strips.
    Edited to add picture:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2013
  10. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, sure, anything can be moved if you want it moved. I've seen where they move muti-story brick and mortar buildings. If I wanted my coop moved, I'd slide a couple of skids under it and drag it to where ever, and I got the tractor to do it, if I wanted to. But, it's going no where, because its where I want it. !00 birds, you need more fence, would make it a lot easier on the grass.
    The thicket just happened to be there, and was another reason the coop is where it is. The birds make use of it year round. I have to go in there from time to time and thin it out to avoid "Lazy chickens" from using nests of opportunity.
     

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