elertified netting sources

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by centrarchid, Dec 16, 2011.

  1. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I am trying to get 4000 lineal feet of electrified poultry netting. Does anyone know of a supplier that has in roles of greater volume than 164 lineal feet? For me the magic increments would be either 250 or 739.8588404 lineal feet.
     
  2. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Those lengths may prove to be to awkward for one person to roll up and move. I have the 100' lengths of Premier 1's double-spiked permanet and on a hot day it can be quite a chore for me to move and keep it from getting tangled up.
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:I would draft six good sized students to move. Based on suppliers, even factory side folks have a hard time handling large roles.


    Do you move yours at night?
     
  4. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I tried moving at night but it was a lot of work for me to move a 200' x 200' section and wagons to fresh pasture in the dark. What I ended up doing at the end was kind of how an inch-worm moves. I would collapse the back 100 feet and reattach it to the other side. The chickens remained fenced in except for brief periods of time. I would move the wagons within the area as needed. The LGD would take this opportunity to wander beyond the fence and do whatever for a couple hours, but she always returned to rest by the wagons.
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:I tried moving at night but it was a lot of work for me to move a 200' x 200' section and wagons to fresh pasture in the dark. What I ended up doing at the end was kind of how an inch-worm moves. I would collapse the back 100 feet and reattach it to the other side. The chickens remained fenced in except for brief periods of time. I would move the wagons within the area as needed. The LGD would take this opportunity to wander beyond the fence and do whatever for a couple hours, but she always returned to rest by the wagons.

    I want to run six of these things, three of them are to be moved at 28-day intervals and three are to be at same location for duration of production season.


    How many birds do you have per acre? What management do you employ prior to moving birds onto a patch. We are going to graze with ruminants, most likely a combination of sheep and goats.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I've got the Premier 164' not permanent 48" and it is challenging enough to move by myself. 4000' long? I'm sure you've considered which charger you need for that. You are usually pretty thorough and think things through.

    I'm not sure how permanent you want it to be. Have you considered regular fencing with three hot wires, one real low, one a foot up, and one at the top? It might be more practical for what you want to do? Maybe permanently fence separate paddocks and move them from one to another? The charger to handle poultry netting at that length would be my concern, but I have not looked into that.

    No, I don't know of any sources for longer lengths.

    I don't move mine at night, but I don't have nearly the number of chickens you do. I just leave them locked in the run, take the netting down, mow the new route to get the grass and weeds as low as I can get them along the new route, and put the netting up. Mine spend every night in the permanent coop and my paddock areas can be accessed from my permanent run and coop. Different conditions for different people. I don't know what the permanent Premier netting is like, but my concern with mine about moving it at night would be snags.
     
  7. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:There will be six units, each with 1/6 of total 4,000 lineal feet. Each pasture is to be about 1 acre. One charger is expected to carry load for each pasture bit we will be near upper end of chargers capacity.

    I was hoping to move fencing at night when birds where on roost so mobile hen house and fencing can be moved without birds going all over.
     
  8. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Last year I ran about 300 birds per acre, but about 100 or so was Cornish Cross. The Cornish Cross slept under the wagons with the LGD, and quite a few chickens roosted on the running gear itself. I gave up trying to get all my chickens into the mobile hen houses prior to moving. I looked like an old fool running around the field with a net chasing chickens. That was why I adopted the inch-worm style of moving, and moving during the daytime afforded chickens the opportunity to get out of the way of the moving wheels. No birds got hurt employing this method, even the Cornish Cross.

    This year my birds are going to be pastured next to a working gravel pit and commercial shingle mill. My plans are to have 300 layers and juveniles per acre with four mobile hen houses in operation. The Cornish Cross will be separated from my laying flock due to cannibalization. I will be moving the fence less, and will still only move during the daytime.
     
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Quote:Last year I ran about 300 birds per acre, but about 100 or so was Cornish Cross. The Cornish Cross slept under the wagons with the LGD, and quite a few chickens roosted on the running gear itself. I gave up trying to get all my chickens into the mobile hen houses prior to moving. I looked like an old fool running around the field with a net chasing chickens. That was why I adopted the inch-worm style of moving, and moving during the daytime afforded chickens the opportunity to get out of the way of the moving wheels. No birds got hurt employing this method, even the Cornish Cross.

    This year my birds are going to be pastured next to a working gravel pit and commercial shingle mill. My plans are to have 300 layers and juveniles per acre with four mobile hen houses in operation. The Cornish Cross will be separated from my laying flock due to cannibalization. I will be moving the fence less, and will still only move during the daytime.

    Your density of 300 hundred birds per acre is much higher than what I am contemplating. We are considering 50 to 100 birds / acre. Mine will be laying hens only. I am trying to see how pasture management will influence forage quantity and quality. We are trying to reduce the amount of feed needed for laying hens. Also very interested in how poultry passage will prepare pasture for next round of ruminant grazing. Another issue to be explored is the types of fescue, especially in respect to the types of endophytes they have. Do foraging chickens prefer to associate and forage in particular types of fescue?

    Can you be reached by phone?
     
  10. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Yes, you can give me a call tonight around 7:30 PM to 8:00 PM EST.
     

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