EMERGENCY: Hen with injured neck

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ChookCluck, Oct 8, 2011.

  1. ChookCluck

    ChookCluck Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 3, 2011
    My young (still on growers feed) Croad langshan hen stuck down a small gap this morning. When I pulled her out, her neck drooped almost to the floor. It appears that she must have either injured it falling down the gap, or strained it trying to pull herself out. I presume it isn't broken, and she is eating and drinking well, considering. She doesn't appear to be in pain, and tries to lift her neck up sometimes, but it appears to take up a lot of energy.

    What should I do? Will she be alright?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. heatherindeskies

    heatherindeskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think she needs some time. If not sprained, surely her muscles are aching for now and need time to heal. Make sure she has easy access to feed and water, lower her bowls if needed.
    If you're a pet kinda person, let her sit on your lap on one leg with her head and neck able to extend to the other for support and lightly massage her neck, taking note to quit if she shows signs of pain.
    Make sure the others are not seeing her as disabled and picking on her...
     
  3. ChookCluck

    ChookCluck Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 3, 2011
    Thanks for your help. What if it is sprained, and not just aching muscles? Will it still heal?
     
  4. heatherindeskies

    heatherindeskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2010
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    Sorry, I know nothing about sprained muscles. maybe someone else will come along! They heal in humans, so i would assume so....just a guess.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2011
  5. ChookCluck

    ChookCluck Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 3, 2011
    I hope so, I'll have to see how she gets on. Thanks for all the advice!
     
  6. kidcody

    kidcody Overrun With Chickens

    Just give her time. Try keeping her warm in a stress free area. You could even put warm compress on her neck. As long as there is not too much swelling. Feed her scrambled eggs and buttermilk for energy. Just try to make her life a little easier. Time will tell. The fact that she can eat and drink is a very good sign. Chickens are very tough animals.
     
  7. Uniontown Poultry

    Uniontown Poultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    I agree. If she got stuck somewhere, she may have pulled something struggling to get out. Chickens rebound from these sort of things pretty well, and as long as she's eating, drinking, and otherwise acting mostly normal, I wouldn't worry too much. Just keep an eve on her so you can see if she starts having trouble.

    I had something similar happen once, when my BO cockerel got wedged between our oil tanks. It had been raining the night before & so I guess my bird-count at the night's lockdown was shoddy. The next morning, I heard a pitiful croaking from around the oil tanks, and there he was - wings up, and spread open, legs dangling down, body wedged between the tanks. He'd been hanging here all night in the rain. I pulled him out by the wings (there was nothing else to grab), and wrapped him in a towel (he promptly bit me). His legs didn't work and his wings hung lifeless. I gave him water, put him under a heat lamp, and massaged his legs. He could not walk. I was thinking what kinds of damage the hanging there all night might have done to his joints and nerves, and thought maybe he'd never walk again. After a few days (when he spent 1/2 the day sitting outside with food and water within reach, and 1/2 the day inside in a crate with a heat lamp), he was right as rain again. He was able to walk, flap his wings, and do all sorts of roostery things. Totally back to normal. He stayed away from the oil tanks, though. [​IMG]

    So my point is, that they can be incredibly resilient. Give your girls some time, some TLC, and keep an eye on her. As long as she can eat, drink, and get around, and she isn't being picked on by her mates or acting depressed and listless, she'll probably bounce back once her neck's no longer sore. Good Luck!!
     

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