EMERGENCY! Please help! Something is hanging out my drakes butt! (Not a penis)

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by hugitnotnugget, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. hugitnotnugget

    hugitnotnugget Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 14, 2016
    He has an infected phallus and he had it removed about 7 months ago. He is less than a year old. Today he has a large mass hanging out he anus. Our vet is closed today and tomorrow! He can poop but their too dry. He's drinking a lot of water and we're trying to give him foods like lettuce that can come out eaiser. He try's to push sometimes and it looks like it is torn. There is blood. PLEADE HELP!
     
  2. hugitnotnugget

    hugitnotnugget Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 14, 2016
    It is also dripping what seems to be water.
     
  3. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Sounds like a prolapse can you let him soak in some cool water that may help with bleeding and swelling. How bad is he bleeding? There is things you can put on the bleeding part like blood stop or flour or corn starch.
     
  4. NDgoatgirlNV

    NDgoatgirlNV Chillin' With My Peeps

    1 person likes this.
  5. hugitnotnugget

    hugitnotnugget Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He isn't bleeding bad. I worried what we can do for him and if he will be ok. He is acting fine but he tries to push it out. It is about a... well a little smaller than a baseball of a mass. Should I be trying to push it back in? Or that could make things worse..
     
  6. hugitnotnugget

    hugitnotnugget Chillin' With My Peeps

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    DOEs vent prolapse happen in male ducks too?
     
  7. NDgoatgirlNV

    NDgoatgirlNV Chillin' With My Peeps

  8. NDgoatgirlNV

    NDgoatgirlNV Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've only every heard of it occurring in hens, but with nature, anything is possible, here is some info I found on the internet, it's regarding treatment of prolapse in hens, but at this point, I don't think it would hurt to try this on your drake.

    Prolapse is usually more prevalent in older laying hens although younger hens can also suffer if their diet is not properly balanced. Ex-batts are particularly prone with their enforced daily laying routine meaning they can develop the condition at any time.
    There are things you can try to help remedy the condition but the very first thing to do is isolate the affected hen from the rest of the flock. This is because if any other hens notice they will peck at it unmercifully which can lead to more serious problems than the original prolapse. You should also stop feeding layer’s pellets/mash and give her mixed corn instead.
    Rest and relaxation

    It is possible that under the right conditions the prolapse can retract and heal on its own but for this to work your hen will need to be isolated, kept inactive and need regular attention.
    Clean her back end off as best you can by holding it over the kitchen sink and letting warm water run over the area. This might enable you to dissolve any dried poo on the prolapsed tissues. Do not pull or pick any poo from her vent, it could harm the fragile tissues so it is safer to leave what has not washed off. Isolate the hen and try to prevent her from producing eggs for a few days so the tissue isn’t re-stressed. This allows many prolapses to heal on their own.
    The recommended way to stop the laying process is to put the hen in a dark environment, the darker the better. Egg laying is dependent on the light/dark cycle of day and night. Reduce feed to a mere maintenance level and replace layer’s mash or pellets with corn so there is no “extra” nutrition that the hen needs in order to produce an egg.
    This is most easily achieved using an old pet carrier or crate situated in a quiet, warm room.
    Line the crate using a good layer of whatever bedding the hen is normally used to. Ensure she has feed and water dishes, preferably the type that can be attached to the door or sides of the crate so that she is unlikely to spill her water or food all over the crate floor. Keep her quiet and in the dark and she should settle down well.
    Check on her at regular intervals – set a time, say hourly or two hourly at first, then the time can be lengthened after the first day if she appears to be improving. A visit twice or three times a day should then suffice .
    Turn on the light when you go in to check her so that she can see her food and water to enable her to eat and drink if she wants to. This is a chance to lift her out of the crate and check her vent and give her a little fuss. Do this whilst you are cleaning away any poo, replacing any bedding and replenishing her food and water.
    You can offer her scrambled or chopped up hard boiled egg mixed with a little cod liver oil and Vitamin E. The egg offers perfect protein for healing damaged tissues. The cod liver oil is also a good healer and helps fight infection. Vitamin E is a valuable aid to repairing damaged tissue. Live pro-biotic yogurt can also help avoid infection.
    Preferably isolation should not exceed three days in order to avoid the flock “forgetting” the hen but do not re-introduce her if there is any sign of the prolapse remaining for the reasons mentioned earlier.
    It is best to re-introduce the hen to the flock during the hours of darkness after they have gone to roost. That way when they awake in the morning it’s as if she has never been away.
    Give nature a helping hand

    This technique usually works well if you have the time. A quicker method is to try reinserting the prolapsed tissue yourself.
    Wearing protective gloves carefully apply a lubricant around the vent area and on the prolapse itself then gently push the prolapsed tissue back into her vent. Apply firm but gentle pressure for approximately five minutes and the prolapse should stay in place.
    If the prolapse pops out again use some honey on a gloved finger to push it back in. The honey will reduce any swelling and also helps prevent infection setting in.
    If you’ve been advised to use haemorrhoid cream, please stop. It only makes things worse for your hen. Haemorrhoid cream is intended to help haemorrhoidal tissues by shrinking blood vessels. Even though a prolapse is at the chicken’s vent, prolapsed tissues are NOT haemorrhoids, or related to haemorrhoids (which are swollen blood vessels). Prolapses are the insides of the chicken, not swollen blood vessels. Applying creams for piles shrinks the blood vessels of the chicken’s prolapsed tissues, but does not shrink the prolapse. Instead, it inhibits blood circulation in the prolapsed tissues, drying it and making it tight and sore, which delays healing as the blood carries healing nutrients. Shrinking the blood vessels in the prolapsed tissues also means that any infection in those tissues cannot be cleared away as easily by the blood. So, although using a haemorrhoid cream seems “right” on an intuitive level, using it is actually counter-productive. In fact in some cases it can actually increase the inflammation. Use a lubricating cream instead.
    If neither of these methods appear to be working take your hen to a chicken friendly vet as they may be able to suggest an alternative course of treatment and prevent any infection setting in during the healing
     
  9. NDgoatgirlNV

    NDgoatgirlNV Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sorry for the mild delays in my response time, but I am writing in between calls at my job. I work for a company that does closed captioning for telephone call for the deaf and hearing impaired....and we aren't allowed to loo online during calls...in between calls is fine though, LOL

    I hope your boy gets better. I hate to see or hear about animals being in any form of pain.
     
  10. NDgoatgirlNV

    NDgoatgirlNV Chillin' With My Peeps

    Here is some more helpful info...


    hemorrhoids ARE prolapsed tissues. That’s PRECISELY what they are. They are prolapsed intestine/rectum and I think you are getting confused. You can have a prolapsed penis in a rooster or a reptile, etc, or you can have a prolapsed oviduct, or you can have a prolapsed intestine. The hemorrhoid creams reduce inflammation, the same as sugar water or honey, but they aren’t as messy and don’t attract debris to the tissues as badly. A prolapse that won’t self correct and has been traumatized is necessarily considered to be inflamed tissue. The best way to reduce inflammation and encourage retraction of such prolapsed tissue is with an anti-inflammatory approach. The tissue should be treated prior with sterile saline or room temp bottled water, and may be rinsed with a dilute topical rinse such as chlorhexidine gluconate .05% or weaker, and preventative systemic antibiotics can be given afterward. The best way to deal with inflamed prolapsed tissue, is to reduce the inflammation that is going to probably lead to the tissue not returning to normal, or causing the prolapse to occur again.

    As I commented above, there are a few different home remedies to try. And whether using the hemorrhoid cream longer term is safe or not depends on what’s in THAT formulation. The type I use is mostly composed of shark liver oil, and that would be quite safe to use for an extended period. I would repeat the treatment. I’ve found more success with the hemorrhoid cream when sugar-water paste did not help much, but in many cases the hemorrhoid cream wasn’t enough and injections of dexamethasone steroid anti-inflammatory were required. Sometimes a suture with a stitch or two helps. I have done this before to help tighten things up for a little while, until inflammation goes down and things return to normal and most of the time the prolapse didn’t return, or at least for some time.
    Take note though that I am a rehabilitator with veterinary medical skills and I have all these things available to do this myself. For the obtaining dexamethasone or suturing, you are probably going to have to consult a vet, and yes, I absolutely would recommend an avian (chicken) experienced vet. Make sure they know that chickens are not tolerant of lidocaine and similar derivatives for anesthetic. And as to whether you should put in the effort, I merely say that all things want to live, and if treatment is realistically possible, then you should treat.
     

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