Empty crop at night?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by faceache, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. faceache

    faceache Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all I have a 7 month old pekin and she has never gone to bed with a full crop I'm not sure why will this harm her? And why is she not stockin up for the night?
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    She may just be at a good weight and efficient enough to not need huge amounts. My little Pekin mixes and other bantams rarely 'stocked up for the night', yet always did great, whereas my commercial types always stocked up and often didn't show anywhere near the hardiness of the others.

    Best wishes.
     
  3. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Just as people are all different so are chickens. You need to judge her individually. Is she healthy and normal acting? Does she have nice glossy feathers? Do you see her eating at certain times of the day? Does she poop normally?

    What may be normal for one hen, may not be for another. They come in different sizes and weights, too. I have a very tiny Welsummer, but she's normal in every respect except for size and the amount she eats compared to the others. She lays the same size eggs as the others despite her petite size. Her crop is proportionally small.

    So try not to worry if you have one that is slightly different. It's okay.
     
  4. faceache

    faceache Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the reply guys yes she is normal in all other ways and is actually the healthiest looking one I have :)
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Worth mentioning that frequently letting the gastrointestinal system clear out completely is one of the main traits you find in all healthy and long lived domestic species, pretty much. The digestive system remains at its healthiest when it can clear out for even a short time period on a regular basis, and therefore rest and regenerate without interruption.

    All health hinges on the digestive system, you've probably heard of the studies on animals of multiple species showing that animals that were fed less rather than more, as per the usual intermittent availability of food sources for the species in the wild, live longer with fewer health problems.

    In the past, and even in modern times, many poultry-keepers valued these 'fasts' for supporting full health and knew their value.

    Unfortunately many people panic if a chook doesn't eat and forcibly cram things into them, which when an animal is already sick can be fatal to them. (Of course, it can be lifesaving too, depends on the things being force fed to them and the problem they have, but it's a fine line to tread).

    Fasting is beneficial to total health in moderation and correct timing.

    I'm not suggesting you fast them, just that it should be more widely known that it's not always a sign of illness for an animal to choose not to be stuffed to the gills; fasting is a natural reaction to illness and sometimes injury which allows the system to focus all resources on tackling the problem and healing faster, rather than always being a problem in itself.

    It's also during the night time that animals with speedy metabolisms naturally fast, even chooks of metabolic types or breeds that 'stock up for the night' are empty by morning if reasonably healthy, almost as a rule.

    Best wishes.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. faceache

    faceache Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks chooks that's a great bit of info x
     

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