Emu eggs on their way, I need some help

Discussion in 'Ostriches, Emu, Rheas' started by ryo92, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. ryo92

    ryo92 Out Of The Brooder

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    So I just ordered 5 Emu eggs and Im having some trouble finding consistent information on incubation temperature, humidity, and how many times they should be turned. Also what is the best type of incubator to use? Can a modified chicken incubator work? Any information all of you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much!!!


    Ryo
     
  2. ryo92

    ryo92 Out Of The Brooder

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    Also any hatching techniques you all may have would be greatly appreciated. Im a little confused about the whole weight loss thing so if someone could please simplify all of that for me it would be greatly appreciated!
     
  3. Raptor65

    Raptor65 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I incubated my eggs at 97.5, but you can go as low as 96 and some people prefer 96 degrees. If I were to do it again I'd incubate at 97 or 96.5 because I was battling rising temperatures both inside and outside the incubator as they got closer to their due date.

    Personally I turned mine every two hours until day 46 starting at 6 AM and ending at 10 PM, but most people only turn their eggs 3-4 times a day it, I just liked going the extra mile hoping it would increase the chances of a chick in each of my two eggs. When turning, you want to turn them 180 degrees back and forth about their long axis.
    The eggs rest on their sides, with the pointy end horizontal instead of vertical so picture a rolling pin, rather than flipping the rolling pin end over end you just roll it about it's long axis. I put two pieces of masking tape with an X on one side and an O on the other and used an arrow I cut out of a piece of cardboard to let me know which way to turn them each time.

    The weight loss thing is really very simple. The eggs are porous so water leaks out naturally as they incubate, you want the amount of water loss to be between 10 and 15% of the egg's weight by the time they hatch, you manage this by increasing or decreasing the humidity, then weighing them every week, but I have read you can also weigh them every day until you get the humidity just right and they'll lose about a gram per day depending on the weight of the egg and this may be the way to go at first.
    The way to set the humidity is to just set a cup of water inside the incubator, you want the humidity to be about 35%, but the only reliable way to tell is to weigh the eggs and see how they're doing as most of the hydrometers out there aren't accurate. It's surface area, not the volume of water that creates the humidity.
     
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  4. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    check the link in my signature.. then let us know if you have any more questions
     
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  5. ryo92

    ryo92 Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, both of you have helped so much. The eggs just came in this afternoon, so Im going to let them adjust to room temp before I put them into the incubator. I can't get the humidity exactly right. Do you have any tips for this? Im using a modified LG incubator.
     
  6. Raptor65

    Raptor65 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I recommend just setting a decent sized cup about as big around as a soda can or maybe a little larger in there and weighing the egg over the next few days or next week after you set it and don't be afraid to add more or larger water containers if the eggs aren't on target.

    I used a hydrometer too but it's not very accurate at all so I just used it to tell when I had a constant humidity rather than the exact humidity. Not all Emu eggs loose water at the same rate too, so you sort of have to tailor the humidity to best fit the eggs you have, weight loss control is the goal rather than a specific humidity percentage. On top of that the environment where you live plays a hand as well. But don't be worried by it, just start with one water container and adjust the amount as necessary.

    Also the location of the water containers in the incubator can affect the weight loss, eggs farther away from the water loose weight faster than one placed right next to the water. So does airflow from a fan in the incubator. If you get an egg that's loosing weight too fast you might try closer to the water or away from the fan.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2012
  7. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    like Raptor said... it really depends on the humidity where you live.. I dry incubated mine (no water) and in one bator I did have to rotate the eggs around every day in relationship to the fan

    so if you find that having water in your bator is causing too slow of a weight loss feel free to try dry incubating them since weight loss in the eggs is the deciding factor as to how much (if any) surface area for water that you need
     
  8. ryo92

    ryo92 Out Of The Brooder

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    So Im on day 4 of incubation. Temperature and humidity has stayed at the 97.5 range and humidity has been constant. Weight loss is going perfect. I do have a question though. One of my friends just hatched out an Emu and wants me to take it. Will it get along with the ones that hatch out or no? I dont want to get him/her and have it not like the others if they hatch.
     
  9. Blarneyeggs

    Blarneyeggs Overrun With Chickens

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    thank you for starting this thread! My son brought home an Emu egg today! I ran out and got a LG incubators nd am curious as to how you adapted yours. How is your hat h going? Did you take your friend's Emu? I would have, I'm such a sucker.
     

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