endangered species??

Discussion in 'Pheasants and Partridge (Chukar)' started by Boggy Bottom Bantams, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 9, 2008
    Hahira, GA
    Over the years, I have had a little bit of everything mammals, reptiles, and of course birds. A lot of the stuff I had was on the endangered species list and for sales of any of these over state lines an endangered species permit was required for both the seller and the buyer. In states sales only require the buyer to have one. This was true to on my waterfowl, Laysan Teal and Nene Geese.
    I have always wondered, but never wanted to ask (for fear of the answer) but seeing how a lot of the commonly kept species of pheasants are also on this list, why does no one seem to have to have this permit to sell them? Never once in all my years of keeping birds, have I ever seen anyone with a permit for endangered species selling endangered pheasants?

    Just curious if any of you may know the answer to this??
     
  2. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    The Copper Pheasant
    I will try to find some info...
     
  3. Lophura

    Lophura Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 23, 2008
    Holden, Missouri
    In the early 90s, several organizations went before congress and had the waterfowl species you mentioned & pheasants removed from the restrictions the ESA of 73 have on interstate transport of animals. If memory serves me right, it was 95 or 96 before we were able to move species such as Swinhoe across state lines. The success of the Laysan Teal captive program and groups like APWS was responsible for getting this done. Could only imagine how inbred our birds would be had this not taken place.

    I believe you can find the complete list of exempt animals if you visit the USFWS site.

    Dan
     
  4. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 9, 2008
    Hahira, GA
    Thanks Dan,
    always wondered how they got around that, good to know though, That was about the time, I had to sell off all my stuff, getting them all back now, so this is good news. Yep you are dead on, it definately was for the betterment of the species to be able to freely move them from breeder to breeder without those restictions. Many breeders wouldnt be able to acquire the permits and the gene pool would definately suffer as a result...
     
  5. Lophura

    Lophura Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 23, 2008
    Holden, Missouri
    If I hadn't had to move three times since last November, I would still have all my Gazettes, APWS, & club newsletters in order to grab from and give all the details of the changes that took place in the 90s regarding the interstate transfers.

    I'm afraid that were are going to be soon getting to a point where new blood is going have to brought in from overseas. Some of these species haven't had an influx of new genes since 60s. Pheasant aviculture has gone through cycles of popularity (usually one gets in and gets out because of predators or boredom, others try for profit and realize there is none, and others are forced out due to circumstances beyond their control - me, 3 times!!!), but there seems to be 10 or so that have been with it for decades. Most of our birds can one way or another can be traced back to this stock. Importation is expensive and someone must be dedicated to the cause and keep accurate records of where the birds are placed. I know several who imported birds in the 90s and earlier 2000s, but it was a very tough ordeal for them. Hopefully, someone with the cash, dedication, and time will step up, if not, I'd give us another 20 years and pheasant aviculture with pure birds will be DEAD. Following and researching galliforme aviculture most of my life, it is a bleak outlook for many species.... in captivity and the wild.

    Dan
     
  6. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 9, 2008
    Hahira, GA
    yep, unfortunately that's very true. Wish you did have those magazines still too, I tried for hours last night going threw all the information on the endangered species listing and permits section to find the info on them, but always drew a blank. I'm sure I just wasnt checking the correct spot, obviously, it's a massive site.
    Moves were the same reason I had to get out of all my waterfowl and pheasants too. Back on my farm now, with 130 acres to play with, so ready to start getting them all back, cant wait!
    I too, know folks who have done the import thing, all seem to have tons of problems and end up in the $1000- $1500 range on birds after it's all done. Unfortunately, that cuts out most would be importers from attempting it. But yes, we definitely need many new lines of blood for our American flocks, or it wont be long.... Like you said, many are so watered down now, and inbred that it's already getting very bad for those
     

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