1. Demeter80113

    Demeter80113 New Egg

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    Feb 3, 2014
    I am looking to become a first-time chicken owner and have just moved to Englewood, Colorado. From what I can find online, there is no maximum on the number of chickens one can keep. Does anyone know any other details? Is an agricultural animal permit required? Thank you!
     
  2. greggles

    greggles Just Hatched

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    Sep 25, 2016
    I'm looking for this answer too. I did some searching and ended up going to the Englewood Municipal code and searching that for "Fowl".

    The three big sections I could find are:


    Quote:
    The biggest thing to me seems to be:

    1. Remove manure from the premises once a week - this might be hard if the plan is to compost it, but as long as the manure is picked up from the coop/run once a week and it doesn't smell it seems like this is OK.
    2. Don't let the sounds or smells annoy your neighbors, who are the determinants of "disturbing the peace". Probably a good idea to alert them to your plan in advance and then maybe hand over fresh eggs while checking in every now and then to keep them happy.

    If anyone has practical experience with this code, please do share.
     
  3. greggles

    greggles Just Hatched

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    Sep 25, 2016
    @aim0474 Thanks for your help in researching this issue. That pdf you linked is about the city of Englewood, New Jersey, check http://www.cityofenglewood.org/ That does make it tricky to find the right details.
     
  4. aim0474

    aim0474 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lol. Well never mind then! I thought I had found a gold mine.
     
  5. greggles

    greggles Just Hatched

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    Sep 25, 2016
    The Code Enforcement Advisory Committee in Englewood is seeking to update their code to be more specific about chickens. They are in the information gathering stage right now and no specific proposal has been made. It is likely that the new rules will be more restrictive than the current rules. We can work to keep them as permissive as reasonably possible, but it will require research and effort.

    I'd love to work with other chicken owners in the area:
    1. to hear about their reasons for keeping chickens, what is important or not, their practices to manage different problems (fires, rodents, noise are the big concerns)
    2. to coordinate an effective response to the city to ensure chickens are not regulated unfairly in comparison to other animals

    Please feel free to send me a private message or respond on this thread :)
     
  6. accdntlrooster

    accdntlrooster New Egg

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    We're in Englewood and have had 6 hens for two years now. I've talked to Code enforcement and animal control about other issues (not our issues) and have never been asked about the birds even when standing right next to the coop. We warned our neighbors about our plans and have only been asked not to have a rooster which is an understandable request.
     
  7. greggles

    greggles Just Hatched

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    @accdntlrooster thanks for your thoughts. I wonder if you could share your experience about managing smells, rodents, and whether you have culled any birds on your property?

    The current englewood code says that all manure must be removed from the property within 7 days. I would prefer for it to be updated to say something like "chicken manure must be appropriately processed within 7 days in a way that manages odor" so that chicken owners can compost the manure.

    It sounds like it's not important to you to keep the option open for roosters (or maybe you even are opposed to roosters in Englewood?). Good to know that as well :)
     
  8. accdntlrooster

    accdntlrooster New Egg

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    We compost our manure and have not had any smell issues. We have a composter and an area that has the manure turned into it. We're sensitive to smells and probably over cautious about our neighbors piece and quiet. We'd like to have roosters but our relationships with the neighbors are more important. Rodents have been minimal and we leave traps when needed.
     

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