English Partridge

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Ducks and Banny hens, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    [​IMG]
    Hello everyone!
    I am working with a new breed that originated in my area (this breed has been dubbed the Bow Lake. It is a bantam that is very hardy and rather broody). Recently, a new color variety has appeared as a sport in a flock of the now-extinct (well there is 1 hen left) Barred Bow Lake fowl. I bought this hen when I assumed stewardship of the breed. Actually at first, I was unaware of these birds being a 'breed'. However, the generally excepted criteria for the title 'Breed' is something that breeds true to type (and usually color). The birds met that criteria and efforts began to breed it selectively from now on. Now that you're familiar with the history of the breed, let's move on. I contacted a geneticist / friend of mine inquiring what this hen was genetically, and what a Cock would look like. The color is called English Partridge (genotype e+/e+, S/S, Ar/ar+ ). This is the non-columbian version of the recognised Serama color Silverbuff (aka cocopop). There is currently no English Partridge rooster accounted for, so breeding her to a Silver Duckwing is neccesary to save the variety. I'm excited to see what a e+/e+ S/S Ar/Ar bird will look like. In the Serama columbian version (White-laced Silverbuff or cocopuff) there is white lacing everywhere. This color would look nice with white lacing. If anyone has any info aboutor pictures of this unidentified counterpart (e+/e+, S/S, Ar/Ar) of English Partridge, please let me know. Thanks.
     
  2. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Oh, and, if anyone knows the name for a (e+/e+, S/S, Ar/Ar) bird, or if a name doesn't exist, a proposed names, please inform me. Thanks
     
  3. stephanie1992

    stephanie1992 Chillin' With My Peeps

    she looks like an old english game bantam
     
  4. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Quote:Yes she does. Although the breed's background can only be speculated, it is very probable that there is OEGB blood in it. This breed has a couple of fundamental differences though: 1) the size difference. These birds are sized in between Mille Fleurs and Pekin bantams. Much bigger banties than OEGBs. 2) Leg feathering. This breed has Vulture Hocks (the tuft of feathers at the ankle) and nice even feathering along the legs (my 'standard' for the breed is that they only have light, small leg feathers, like a North Holland Blue). Other breeds speculated to have blood in this breed are d'uccle (aka Mille Fleur), and Serama. Here's a Cock of the breed (a Gold Birchen):
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2011
  5. stephanie1992

    stephanie1992 Chillin' With My Peeps

    ohhh ok. i seee the differences now. u planning on sellingg any hatching eggs in the spring lol
     
  6. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Quote:I haven't made this very public until now, but, the two birds you see here are the only living birds 'accounted for' (the many other specimens have been distributed as 'Banny hens' (Barnyard bantams; Mutts). I have no way of knowing where they are now. I do not feel these birds deserve the title 'mutt' rather 'Breed rising'. The birds show amazing self-conformation but the 'originator' didn't know that and... Now the breed is going to change a little. The silver duckwing I mentioned earlier is going to be a Dutch or OEGB rooster. However, whatever type next year's birds have, that's the type I'll continue to breed for so, by next year, there'll probably 20 or so Bow Lake bantams, and these two will be, once again, title-less.

    I am contemplating breeding these two together to keep the breed type as it is now, although there'd be quite the genetic calcaphony to sort out. I still want to save this color now. So in direct answer, Probably no eggs in the spring.[​IMG]
     
  7. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,759
    37
    183
    Nov 29, 2008
    Groesbeek Netherlands
    The bird looks like a wildtype colored chicken, genetically a gold duckwing. Maybe het wheaten (red leakage on shoulder).

    I would not call her a non columbian version of cocopop.
     
  8. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Quote:When I first got her, your sentiments exactly, 'Neat. A gold duckwing. I'll take that one.' But as soon as I got a good look at her back at home, I noticed the distinct difference:
    Below is the EP Bow Lake hen:

    [​IMG]

    Below is a purebred BBRed OEGB:

    [​IMG]

    This is why the color is called English Partridge. The Ar gene not only fully restores the gold tones, but rearranges the eumelanin in such a way that it laces the upperbody feathers in tan. Also, the primaries on a duckwing are generally Black, but EPs typically have mottled primaries. Let me know if you still think it's something different. Thanks.

    Below is and English Brown Partridge (slightly different color; eb/eb base) Easter-Egger hen of mine.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  9. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,759
    37
    183
    Nov 29, 2008
    Groesbeek Netherlands
    You mean the "flittering"?
    No, both are selections from the wildtype gold duckwing.
    Exhibition strains are selected against the light shafts and the flitter/rim, that's all.

    She may have one dose of wheaten or Pattern gene.
     
  10. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    [​IMG]
    Quote:Well, that doesn't change my breeding plan anyhow. Either way, English Partridge or Gold Duckwing, I'll breed her to a Silver roo. That way, unless we're both wrong, the color should easily reproduce itself. (Yes, I know, there will be some goldens. But I'm prepared for that.) Also, although I've never heard of flittering before, I know what you mean by it. If I keep selecting for the flittering, I might find there may be something genetic about it. Lest we forget that the Bibbed genes in Mallard-breed ducks derived from 'that duck with a little white spot'. (As of now, I'm selecting for the Bibbed gene in Buff Orpingtons.) Thanks for your input.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by