Entire flock struggling!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jocoker, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. jocoker

    jocoker New Egg

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    I had a flock of 25 chickens, various breeds some for more than 2 years. Raised on organic feed and loved. I wanted a deep brown egg layer and found a local backyard chicken for sale, French Maran pullet. I should have been more careful and quarantined before add to flock but too late. I thought I heard her sneeze and rattle but seemed to recover but within 2 days a hen or two appeared to have difficulty breathing, one quite bad. I brought the sick one up to the house and nursed it but it died within 24 hrs. I had started Tylon 50 injections twice daily to all the birds and we are on day 4. No more have died but everyone is infected, some worse than others with rattling, swollen body parts, sitting around puffed up. Slow to recover but holding on. Anyone have any additional suggestions? Heartbroken as you can imagine..
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Don't beat yourself up. It is a well learned lesson. Quarantine is so important but many roll the dice and don't do it.

    You have to know what the problem is and it isn't necessarily curable with an antibiotic.
    What state are you in? You should send your next dead bird for a necropsy. It is free in some states and even if it isn't it is worth every penny.
    An even better suggestion is to send your sickest bird to the state lab for euthanasia and complete necropsy. The fresher the bird, the more accurate and conclusive the results will be.
     
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  3. jocoker

    jocoker New Egg

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    Sep 7, 2013
    T
    Don't beat yourself up. It is a well learned lesson. Quarantine is so important but many roll the dice and don't do it.

    You have to know what the problem is and it isn't necessarily curable with an antibiotic.
    What state are you in? You should send your next dead bird for a necropsy. It is free in some states and even if it isn't it is worth every penny.
    An even better suggestion is to send your sickest bird to the state lab for euthanasia and complete necropsy. The fresher the bird, the more accurate and conclusive the results will
     
  4. jocoker

    jocoker New Egg

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    Thank you! I live in Southern California. What would I look for for these services?
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Here's your lab. If it isn't close, they should be able to tell you where to go.


    California Animal Health & Food Safety Laboratory
    University of California, School of Veterinary Med
    620 West Health Science Drive
    Davis, California 95616
    Phone: 530-752-8709
     
  6. jocoker

    jocoker New Egg

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    Sep 7, 2013
    Thank you Chickencanoe!
     
  7. animalgrl

    animalgrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've used the lab in CA for a necropsy. When shipping the bird, you can call the lab and ask if they will let you use their shipping number, then you can send the bird at their discounted business rate and they will invoice you the shipping charge. I think doing that saved me quite a bit off the shipping cost.

    Here is some additional info: https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/ahfss/animal_health/pdfs/CAHFS_NecropsyFactsheet.pdf
    and here: http://cecentralsierra.ucanr.edu/files/199953.pdf
    Info on shipping a dead bird: http://cahfs.ucdavis.edu/local_resources/pdfs/submission forms/StandardSubmissionForm_8-15_BYF.pdf

    and here is a link to the website: http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/cahfs/submitting/index.cfm

    Good luck and I hope your flock is able to pull through.
     
  8. jocoker

    jocoker New Egg

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    Well I finished 5 day injections with Tylon and decided to start tetra in their drinking water. Only 3 have respiratory symptoms at this point and they are quarantined, the others are just lethargic and stand around like zombies. Some i have not seen move off the perch and I put drops of water in their beaks and encouraged them to drink and eat. They probably could use some electrolytes and nutrition. Last nite one of the quarantined chickens acted like she had symptoms of gape worm. I read that once you send your chicken to lab and get information back it's often too late but I will give them a call today and see what they say.
     
  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Most likely trying to breath. Some respiratory illnesses - the chicken stretches the neck and gasps- sometime it's a silent gasp, other times they can make a noise.

    Since it seemed to spread so quickly (2days??) most likely is Infectious Bronchitis, but a necropsy and testing would have to confirm this.
    IB won't necessarily "respond" to the antibiotics, but treatment will help with secondary bacterial infections that could accompany it.

    Try to keep them hydrated, give them wet feed this may help, add some egg, tuna or mackerel for protein.

    @casportpony is in California, she has a very good instructions on send a bird for examination. https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/799747/how-to-send-a-bird-for-a-necropsy-pictures


    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/78/infectious-bronchitis-ib/

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
  10. jocoker

    jocoker New Egg

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    Thank you all, and Wyorp, Animalgirl. Gave them some hard boiled egg yolks and raw egg this Am and have been offering wet food and they seem a little better today
     

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