Erratic egg laying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by allicatchickens, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. allicatchickens

    allicatchickens New Egg

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    Dec 4, 2012
    I have 6 hens and feed them a layer pellet and they always have access to food, water and grit I'm in Australia and we are just coming into summer and have had some storms and hot weather recently.

    Up until about 2months ago our 6 hens would lay 4-6 eggs daily. Then we went away and our neighbours topped up their food eveyr second day while we were gone. While we were gone for 2 weeks the 6 hens laid 19 eggs between them all. Since we have come back the production has not increased again. some days we get 6 some days we get none other days we get two.

    Eg Friday we got 3, Saturday 6 sunday none monday none tuesday 2.

    They look healthly but i am concerned about the number of runny chicken poos i am seeing in their coop they are usually brown and liquidy.

    Should I be worried or is this erratic production normal.
     
  2. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    The hot weather is possibly to blame for the runny poo. When chickens are hot they drink a lot of water. Changes in weather could also have an effect on their egg production. Have you dewormed your flock?

    Here's a link to our famous poop chart so you can check and compare, but I warn you, it's [​IMG] :

    http://www.chat.allotment.org.uk/index.php?topic=17568.0
     
  3. allicatchickens

    allicatchickens New Egg

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    Dec 4, 2012
    Thanks those pictures were helpful the poos they are doing certainly seem normal. I have not dewormed my flock do you recommend it?
     
  4. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    Yes, wild birds and earthworms can spread worm eggs around and there is always a bit of a risk your flock will get it when they have access to the outdoors. Most people deworm every 6 months as a precaution. Unless, of course you see evidence of worms in their poo, then you should do it immediately. Don't incubate the eggs the hens lay during the withdrawal period (usually 2 weeks). There will be residue from the dewormer in the eggs and it will have a very bad effect on the developing embryo. Don't feed it back to the hens as this will prolong the withdrawal period. It's entirely up to you if you want to eat the eggs, but most people discard it. You can use Safeguard, Ivomec or Valbazen. I hear Valbazen is very good.
     
  5. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    Actually, it's the other way around. It's safe to feed the eggs back to the hens, but people shouldn't eat them. Although there are no real guidelines for withholding in eggs after worming, two weeks is the usual recommended period. Here's a LONG thread about it. To Worm or Not? And, Piperazine dosage for bantams?

    There's not really enough chemical in the eggs to prolong the withholding period.
     

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