euthanasia

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by NancyAnn, Dec 22, 2016.

  1. NancyAnn

    NancyAnn New Egg

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    I am faced with the task of dispatching a roo.we have only raised layers and let them die naturally of old age. Someone ditched the roo in our yard last year and we attempted to give him a good home. Fast forward to terrorized children and beat up hens. He needs to go. We can't find a taker for him.the broom method looks humane and hands off. Any words of encouragement? I know, I am a sissy. :(
     
  2. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams Premium Member

    Hey NancyAnn

    If you are a sissy, then I am also [​IMG] I have not had to and do not think I could cull a chicken. Not only would it be too upsetting for me as I only have much loved pet bantams, I worry that I would botch it up [​IMG]

    Just a suggestion because it sounds like it is not something you will need to do on a regular basis and become toughened up to or experienced in; on the rare occasions I have had to make the sad decision to euthanize, I have taken my gals to the Vet who have done it for a very small fee and with a chick which hatched with severe deformity, for free.

    I have been able to rehome a couple of roosters from hatches in the past but, of course, there is no guarantee that they will not end up in a pot and I note that your rooster appears to be aggressive so rehoming him is probably not a good option as someone else will have to put up with his bad temperament or again, the pot.

    Also, our local feed store, for a small fee, will take roosters but again, if they can not sell them, their fate is probably not a good one.
     
  3. NancyAnn

    NancyAnn New Egg

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    Thanks, Teila, I am glad I am not the only one. :)
     
  4. NancyAnn

    NancyAnn New Egg

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    Teila, Just a note to you. I did it. We put down the roo. My husband helped, we used the broom stick method. I thought it was going to be horrible. It wasn't. No transport, no stress to him, fast, humane. I feel much better now. Though I took a path you may not be able to take......it was really ok. Thanks for your kind words.
     
  5. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams Premium Member

    Hey NancyAnn many thanks for letting me know ... maybe one day [​IMG]
     
  6. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I understand your apprehension if you've never done it before. I even know a few breeders that don't cull their chickens so it's not out of the ordinary for general chicken keepers. Just wanted to point out if you decide to do it that the broomstick method is more difficult to do right in my opinion than cutting the jugular. If you plan on a long chicken career and want to be able to cull or euthanize, I recommend getting a processing cone and a sharp knife. You simply put the bird head-first in the cone and he/she will calm down in a few seconds. After that draw the knife right behind the ear/jaw bone and they'll be out within about 15-30 seconds without a struggle. You can get the cones at any supplier such as Strombergs, and there are a lot of YouTube videos demonstrating the technique. If you don't have upper body strength the broomstick method might be harder. I've seen a lot of botched broomstick cullings, probably more than any other method. Just wanted to point that out so you don't have a bad experience.
     
  7. NancyAnn

    NancyAnn New Egg

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    Thanks, ejcrist. Even though we only keep layers, it was bound to happen sooner or later. The cone method does look quicker. I'm a bit apprehensive about all the blood associated with the cone method but it something I need to overcome.
     
  8. rebrascora

    rebrascora Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi NancyAnn and well done for biting the bullet and dealing with a difficult situation. I know it is not easy. I use the broomstick method to cull my excess cockerels and I find it reasonably fool proof. I have tried cutting the jugular once they have been despatched with the broom, to bleed them out, but it has always taken me several attempts to get through the skin and feathers to the blood vessel and so I am not confident of doing it on a live bird.

    I hope you are not wasting him and he is now resting in the fridge for a few days before hitting the crock pot.

    Best wishes

    Barbara.
     
  9. NancyAnn

    NancyAnn New Egg

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    Thanks, Barbara! I have kept layers for 5 years now and I finally feel grown up about it. :)
     
  10. rebrascora

    rebrascora Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, I know what you mean. I'm soft as muck and it takes a lot of courage for me to do the killing part of it (my heart races and I feel a bit sick and I've only just managed to do it without crying), but I also feel quite proud of myself for taking responsibility and dealing with this more difficult aspect of poultry keeping .
     

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