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Ever heard of "EYEWORMS?"

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Bantam Barb, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. Bantam Barb

    Bantam Barb New Egg

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    [​IMG][​IMG][/img]
    I have a bantam rooster with what looks like an abcess in front of each eye. The lumps are very hard. I have tried oral antibiotics and topical application on the area with no success. A friend said she thought it might be "eyeworms." I can't find any info on this, and have no chicken vet to turn to. Can anyone help?
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2008
  2. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't know much about chicken worms, but I know that the roundworms that dogs get can cause problems in people's eyes. Maybe something similar? Can you post a pic?
     
  3. Ugly Cowboy

    Ugly Cowboy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 25, 2008
    Corn, OK
    Ive heard of that, I didnt know poultry could get 'em though...
     
  4. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't know if they can or not, but that was my only idea...
     
  5. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS012
    (excerpt:
    "....Each
    species of roundworm tends to infect a specific area of the intestinal gastro tract. Different species of the same genus may infect several different areas of the tract. In general, the different species of roundworms have very similar life cycles. Adult roundworms lay eggs inside the infected bird. The eggs are voided from the hosts through the feces. The eggs incubate in soil before they become infective. Roundworms may or may not require intermediate hosts. The eggs or intermediate hosts must then be consumed by the avian host. Once the infective agent finds its way back to its infective site, the cycle is complete. An interesting example of this is the eye worm ( Oxyspirura mansoni ). The eye worm lays eggs on the surface of the eye. These eggs are then washed down the naso-lachrymal duct and pass into the intestinal tract of the host and are voided with feces. The eye worm eggs must then be consumed by a cockroach, the intermediate host. After an incubation period, the worm larvae becomes free inside the body cavity and legs of the cockroach. After the cockroach has been consumed by the avian hosts (chickens, turkeys, peafowl and ducks) the eye worm larvae are released in the crop. They migrate up the esophagus, tear ducts and back to the eye. The time required for the cycle to be completed may be a few days or several weeks depending upon the worm species......."

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/202800.htm
    (MERCK)
    "...Eggs of Oxyspirura mansoni , Manson’s eyeworm, are deposited in the eye, reach the pharynx via the nasolacrimal duct, are swallowed, passed in the feces, and ingested by the Surinam cockroach, Pycnoscelus surinamensis . Larvae reach the infective stage in the roach. When infected intermediate hosts are eaten, liberated larvae migrate up the esophagus to the mouth and then through the nasolacrimal duct to the eye, where the cycle is completed..........
    As a treatment for Manson’s eyeworm, a local anesthetic can be applied to the eye, and the worms in the lacrimal sac exposed by lifting the nictitating membrane. A 5% cresol solution (1-2 drops) placed in the lacrimal sac kills the worms immediately. The eye should be irrigated with sterile water immediately to wash out the debris and excess solution. The eyes improve within 48-72 hr and gradually become clear if the destructive process caused by the parasite is not too far advanced. "
     
  6. Bantam Barb

    Bantam Barb New Egg

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    Thanks for the help so far, but the eyeworm description dosen't sound like what's going on. The swellings seem to change in size, going up and down. I've also tried warm compresses to try to get them to come to a head. I will try to post a pic later today. He dosen't seem to feel bad, and is eating OK and pretty much acting normal. He just can't see very well.
     
  7. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

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    I have a hen like that as well, though it is only on the one side of her head. I believe it is a sinus infection, but not positive. I also tried Tylan antibiotics, as well as this stuff I bought, for eyes, one drop , one eye, one time. Nothing worked.
    It is very hard, like a marble. If you figure out what to do, tell me too. I was thinking about trying the Vet RX into the cleft in the mouth, previously posted above. Not sure if it will help, but can't be any worse. [​IMG]
     
  8. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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  9. Bantam Barb

    Bantam Barb New Egg

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    I have emailed pics and description to Backyard Poultry Mag. Will pass along any info I get.
     

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