ever heard of "Shanghae" breed of chickens?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Gma, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. Gma

    Gma Out Of The Brooder

    was online reading an old chicken book from late 1800's and the "Shanghae" breed was discussed at lenglth but I have never heard of it and the only reference I can find onlline is from these old books. Is this breed extinct or have a new name? Just wondering, I'm pretty new to this chicken business. [​IMG]
     
  2. cicene mete

    cicene mete Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's probably referring to Cochins, but it could be referring to Brahmas, depending on the context. Names have changed a lot from that time, but Cochins became hugely popular in the 19th century, so that would be my best guess.

    Cochins: The Chinese Shanghai fowl came to England and America in 1845. The name of this Asiatic breed was later changed to Cochin. The earliest Cochins were more or less buff in color. Its striking appearance, due to great size and profuse soft feathering, distinguished it from all other known breeds at the time. Cochins created a sensation in England, resulting in a great boom for the "Cochin China," as it was called in the days of the "Cochin craze."

    Brahmas: An Asiatic breed of fowl, called Chittagongs, Gray Shanghais, and Brahma Pootras, later shortened to Brahma, thought to have been a cross of the Malay and Cochin in India. Imported from Shanghai, China, in the early 1840's, they landed in New England much later. American poultry fanciers made over and refined the original parent stock into the large stately and useful Light and Dark Brahma varieties.

    source: http://urbanext.illinois.edu/eggs/res10-breedhistory.html
     
  3. Buttercup Chillin

    Buttercup Chillin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 27, 2008
    SouthEast TX
    Cochins.

    They came to American as the Shanghai China fowl back in 1845. They created what is refered to as the Cochin Craze in England then.

    Cochins and Langshan are both Asiatic birds.
     
  4. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Claremore, OK
    Cochins, Langshans and Brahmas are all Asiatics.
     
  5. aveca

    aveca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2009
    Waverly, NY
    Back in the 1800s they spelled things like they sounded not like they are correctly spelled sometimes.

    Cochins: The first records in the UK date back to the 1830's / 40's when early imports were presented to Queen Victoria and they were known as Shanghai's and of differing types. The game forms were used in the Malay and the large abundantly feathered ones were consolidated in the Cochin. The Chinese Shanghai fowl came to England and America in 1845. The name of this Asiatic breed was later changed to Cochin. The earliest Cochins were more or less buff in color. Its striking appearance, due to great size and profuse soft feathering, distinguished it from all other known breeds at the time. Cochins created a sensation in England, resulting in a great boom for the 'Cochin China', as it was called in the days of the 'Cochin craze'.

    a link to an 1800s book page
    http://books.google.com/books?id=21...AQ#v=onepage&q=Shanghae chicken breed&f=false
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2010
  6. Monterey

    Monterey Out Of The Brooder

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    Actually I just posted this link I found to a scanned copy of a book from the Massachusetts State College Library you can download for free.
    George Burnham raised Shanghaes as they were then called for 30 years in Massachusetts prior to writing it. He imported birds directly from Shanghae. It is he who gave Queen Victoria 9 of his finest Gray Shanghaes in December 1852.
    He insists that both Cochins and Brahmas came from birds imported from the Port Of Shanghae, and were developed in America. He insists that there is no evidence to support that either bird originated in Cochin, China, or more importantly India.

    George Pickering Burnham (1874). The China Fowl: Shanghae, Cochin, and "Brahma". Melrose, Mass.

    http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/82246#page/9/mode/1up
     

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