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Ever think of hydroponics or aquaponics?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Churkenduse, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ever think of hydroponics or aquaponics for growing food for your chickens all year round?

    Well not just for your chickens. You grow an abundant amount of greens, let's say spinach, y favorite. You grow it in your house and with what you do not eat yourself or the stems and roots you feed them to your flock. Once you get the concept you are home free.

    I just bought the products, to set one up cost less than $100.00 much much larger then the Aero garden (we won't get into that) I am waiting for some books I just ordered and I will be all set. I am a gardener so I have some knowledge of indoor gardening. That is just a thought for you resourseful folks out there.

    It would sure keep your guys happy all winter wouldn't it?


    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. hypnofrogstevie

    hypnofrogstevie chick magnet

    Jul 12, 2007
    Newton NJ
    I built my own hydroponic system. I love it. I can clone so many of my own plants. I do tomotoes and house plants`
     
  3. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is great!!!

    I see you are leaving our fair state of NJ.

    I am trying to get the nerve to move to Tennessee. [​IMG]


    Good luck to you! [​IMG]
     
  4. hypnofrogstevie

    hypnofrogstevie chick magnet

    Jul 12, 2007
    Newton NJ
    I really would love to move to NC. Next yr we are moving to PA.
     
  5. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    BC, Washington Border
    We do aquaponics here. Also sprout most of our seeds. Starting a discussion group and information resource on our web forum once I get all the information and pics up.
     
  6. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is fantastic.

    My goal is to be more self sufficient.
    The more I stay out of supermarkets and feed stores the better. I find I am happier without "needing" everything others have to sell.

    I am looking forward to your pics. I purchased a unit for less than $100.00, it was actually some components put together by a resourceful fella.

    If I had more knowledge I could have put it together myself for half the cost. [​IMG]

    Next time I will know better. [​IMG]

    take a look at this: If you want to register and have problems let me know. There is a twist that took me awhile to find the answer to.

    http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/



    [​IMG]
     
  7. skatcatla

    skatcatla Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I used to really be into the idea of hydroponics; since it eliminates the need for a lot of land, diseases and pests, etc.

    However, I've since changed my mind. I've been attending some organic gardening workshops and doing some research on soil management, and based on all this I've come to agree with the idea that soil is flat out necessary for plants. There is a very complex relationship between plants and the microogranisms in soils that is necessary for both plants and soils, as well as a relationship between plants and pests (and the insects that feed on pests); all are required for a healthy and diverse eco-system.

    Plants grown hyroponically are removed from that soil/plant life cycle and so don't have the same nutrient levels; also it eliminates the diversity of life-forms that is inherent in a soil-based growing cycle. So, I say use organic soils and growing methods when possible.

    HOWEVER, for growing plants and fruits for your chickens in the middle of winter, I can definitely see how it would be useful in those colder climates, and in the long-run, it is definitely better for the environment than buying produce that's been shipped long distances.

    Anyway this was my long-winded way of suggesting using hydronic growing systems with caution and sparingly. :-D
     
  8. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree, but the topic was for growing for chickens all winter where there is cold weather. I go crazy looking for some greens for them to eat. I will not buy non organic greens and I am not going to pay $5 for a one time organic treat that is crazy.

    I now grow beet tops and carrot tops, just for fun, also bean sprouts are amazingly nutritiuos and they are grown in water. I really want something more for them in the cold and I think hydroponics will do the trick and maybe I can benefit from it as well.

    Think of this: many of your produce is already grown hydroponically now and you don't even know it. I am n ot sure but i do not think it has to be but on the packaging.

    I am not saying it should be your main source of food just a supplement. I love my garden and I could not possibly grow all the produce I need in my house hydroponically for me, just some for my flock.


    The question of whether plants grown in hydroponic gardens are as nutritious as those grown in soil has never been answered. Some experts believe that the growing method has little to do with a plant's nutritional value. And some maintain that the fact that plants don't come into contact with the soil makes them healthier because there's less of a chance that they'll pick up diseases. On the other hand, the pathogens in the complex soil environment can make some plants produce higher amounts of beneficial compounds.

    [​IMG]

    It's like the same old unanswered question, what came first the chicken or the hen, we may never really know. I just intend to enjoy my new found "hobby"

    I think we sometimes read too much into things and it spoils all the fun. Remember fishing with a cane pole? Exactly like that.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2008
  9. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    Between aquaponics and sprouting all your grains you can cut your feed bill in the winter to 1/4 of the norm. With over 100 chickens in the winter that adds up quickly.
     
  10. quadcam79

    quadcam79 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fernandina Beach Fl.
    I'm working on an aquaponic system right now, finishing up my greenhouse to house it in. I'm going to start with just goldfish but eventually I want to keep tilapia, freshwater prawn and crayfish. I scored about 200 lbs of hydroton for $30 a few months back. so I'm almost ready to get started.

    I guess aquaponics is finally starting to catch on here in the US.
    I go on an aquaponic forum but it's based in australia and most posters are form Oz or Europe.
     

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