1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Eviscerating by splitting down the back.

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by KenK, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    A link on another post led me this description of eviscerating a chicken by splitting the bird down the back rather than taking out the entrails from the "bottom".

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/livestocksystems/components/0701d.html

    I generally cut my bird up into pieces and if I do roast it whole I split it down the back anyway and cook it flattened out.

    I have a nice Sussex cockerel to process in a week or so and am thinking of trying this. My "poultry shears" are not very good and have been using a a sharp pair of tin snips to cut out the back.

    Any comments or suggestions?
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2011
  2. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

    7,480
    179
    298
    Feb 12, 2009
    Ohio
    I don't think I could do that, I'm not very good with a knife, and would be afraid I would slip. Even when I eviscerate the other way I use my fiskar shears, very easy and quick for me, don't have to worry about cutting myself or the entails, good luck and let us know how it works out.
    Michele
     
  3. Erica

    Erica Chillin' With My Peeps

    821
    31
    133
    Dec 5, 2010
    I'm very used to approaching it end-on, but thanks for this link. It looks like a sensible way to process a bird that's destined to be cut up anyhow.

    Sorry I have no tips on doing it. Actually I'm processing about 12 youngsters tomorrow, so I might give it a try and let you know if I meet any obstacles.

    It's great of you to share the info. [​IMG]

    cheers
    Erica
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    19,941
    3,097
    476
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Kinda wish it had gone into detail about how not to cut into intestines or internal organs. Maybe that is not a problem once you actually try it, but I don't see how I could miss making a mess with my talents and abilities. Maybe the secret is the right knife, like a linoleum knife. Many tasks are reaonably easy with the right tool and pretty challenging with the wrong tool.

    With this method, you get two breasts instead of two breasts and a wishbone if you are cutting it into pieces. That may not be a problem for you.

    Maybe my method is not as far off this one as I think, though I usually use poultry shears and a regular knife, depending if I am cutting bone or just meat. Instead of splitting it along the backbone, I generally cut them along the regular breast/back divide a little to open it up to take out the gizzard/intestines, then finish cutting along that divide before taking out the rest of the internals.

    Obviously, it depends on what pieces you want your carcass. I use practically everything that is not the "regular" cuts to make broth, so I want a good part of the upper sides with the back instead of with the breast.

    Thanks for sharing. I'll be on the lookout for your report. Do you plan on a new thread or will you add to this thread? In other words, should I subscribe to this thread or just be on the lookout for it?
     
  5. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    Quote:Seems to me like it would be much easier with shears than any knife. I think if you started at the neck end it would be easier to keep the inside blade of the shears between the back and the intestines.


    Quote:It's hard for me to visualize without a carcass in front of me. It seems like you could still get the wishbone with the bird split down the back but I can see how it might be a harder cut to make.


    Quote:That's what I do to, I cut out the backbone taking a strip about as wide as the neck.


    Quote:I will report back on this thread next Saturday. Once I get him plucked I will visualize the cuts with the bird and shears in hand. At that point I will either balk or give it a try.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    19,941
    3,097
    476
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Quote:Can I blame this one on not enough coffee? I know, excuses, excuses, man up and take responsibility.
     
  7. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

    7,950
    269
    321
    Aug 20, 2010
    Colmesneil,TX
    Some people do quail kind of like this. They use shears to cut down either side of the back bone and when pulled off, nearly all the innards come off with the backbone, plus the neck. Then you cut around the vent and remove.
     
  8. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    Well, I gave it a try this morning. It worked ok, no trouble missing the intestines. With what I have for shears it was certainly no easier than eviscerating the normal way.

    What I need is a good, heavy duty, pair of poultry shears. Any recommendations?

    I bought a pair of expensive Wusthoff shears and sent them back. I think some of these shears are meant to be used to cut up a cooked bird.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    19,941
    3,097
    476
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    No recommendations from me. I don't even know what brand I have.

    Do you think this might get easier with practice? Or would better shears really make that much difference?

    And how would you compare it to just opening them down the rib cage, a cut on each side as opposed to along the backbone. That is the way I have developed to do it myself and I consider that pretty efficient.
     
  10. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    Yes, I do think it would have worked better to cut further out from the back bone. I do think it would work better with at least reasonably good shears. I was using tin snips. My "poultry shears" are just a chintzy and dull pair of kitchen scissors.

    I might just pick up one of those hooked linoleum knives and try it out on an already gutted bird to see how that cuts.

    I've got it packed on ice right now but when I take it out to cook I will post a couple pictures to show how I cut.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by