Excessive heat, vomiting water?

Ashara

In the Brooder
Jun 19, 2021
5
25
44
Oregon
We have had extreme heat for over a week with the last 4 days being 110 to 118. Our coop has lots of shade and we have water misters and a small wading pool available. We change all the water often to keep it cool.. All of our chickens drink a lot and have been panting heavy all day, every day. They all seem very healthy, they eat well, they scratch and socialize and still have little bursts of running and flapping. I noticed over the last two days that when I go to do a headcount and close the hen house doors, a couple hens seem to be vomiting lots of water while they are picking their place to roost. They don't seem stressed when this happens and I am assuming it is due to heat and lots of water consumption. Is there anything to worry about? Should I be offering electrolytes in their water or doing anything differently? We have 100 degree weather forecasted for at least the next ten days and possibly longer.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,362
38,403
1,142
Colorado Rockies
Let behavior dictate what to be concerned about. You are correct in assuming the regurgitation of water is an effect of high water consumption. The crop is overfilled with water so that when a chicken bends over to pick something up, it puts pressure on the overfull crop and fluid comes out. This is normal.

You are doing everything right. Your chickens will be able to get through this scorching weather just fine with all you're doing for them. I like to reserve the use of electrolytes for when I'm dealing with a health emergency as overuse of them can lead to health issues as salts accumulate in tissues.

As long as your chickens are behaving normally, they are fine. Be alert for any change in behavior. The first sign of dehydration is uneven gait, walking as if drunk, balance problems, and lethargy. At that point, you want to begin administering electrolytes and take measures to cool down the affected chickens with cold compresses under their wing pits.
 

Ashara

In the Brooder
Jun 19, 2021
5
25
44
Oregon
Let behavior dictate what to be concerned about. You are correct in assuming the regurgitation of water is an effect of high water consumption. The crop is overfilled with water so that when a chicken bends over to pick something up, it puts pressure on the overfull crop and fluid comes out. This is normal.

You are doing everything right. Your chickens will be able to get through this scorching weather just fine with all you're doing for them. I like to reserve the use of electrolytes for when I'm dealing with a health emergency as overuse of them can lead to health issues as salts accumulate in tissues.

As long as your chickens are behaving normally, they are fine. Be alert for any change in behavior. The first sign of dehydration is uneven gait, walking as if drunk, balance problems, and lethargy. At that point, you want to begin administering electrolytes and take measures to cool down the affected chickens with cold compresses under their wing pits.
Thank you so much for your response and all the advise, this makes me feel better. We got a bit of wind today and only got to 98. The hens were having a great time when I checked on them.
 

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