Extremely graphic.. Do not view then complain.. Predator reality

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by av8torcrj, Dec 1, 2014.

  1. av8torcrj

    av8torcrj Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Found this at my pigeon loft this am. A hawk was sitting atop the cage yesterday but I'm thinking raccoon. I just don't see how with the 1x1 wire and all the room the bird has to escape from the perimeter this nasty varmint could do this. It's either a very smart and strong predator or a really lazy and dumb bird. Anyone in agreement or other suggestionsas to culprit?[​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    That's a heartbreaking sight. I don't know how pigeons' night vision is but chickens' is near zero. I've had them pulled through a 3/4" hardware cloth by raccoons.
    Raccoons have excellent night vision, are extremely powerful with very nimble hands. If the bird was able to see the raccoon, it could have been flying around the cage to escape and the raccoon just grabbed it as it was flying by.
    I recommend 1/2" hardware cloth covering any area a raccoon could reach in and reach a bird.
     
  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    If it happened at night, I'd agree that it was raccoon. I don't believe hawks hunt at night. Most birds, it seems, are helpless at night.
     
  4. av8torcrj

    av8torcrj Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree on the hawk. There is a barred owl that hangs out in a neighboring tree but my feeing is it's picking off the rodents that are in search of scattered feed as opposed to stalking pigeons. Further, I don't see where the hawk or owl would have the dexterity to grasp/hold and pull through those small squares. I'm going with coon as I've seen this same display, albeit through larger openings. They abound around here.
     
  5. Tenneesse

    Tenneesse Out Of The Brooder

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    coon get my vote.
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Raptor. Feathers do not appear slobbered own as typical with raccoon attack and bones do not appear broken.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. gawildlife

    gawildlife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Coon
     
  8. KGreene

    KGreene Out Of The Brooder

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    I'd guess a coon even though there aren't a lot of loose feathers in the photo based on the damage and time of say (night)... The presence of Slobber would actually be more indicative of a possum, K9 or possibly the weasel family. Just as a bit of information in attempts to identify a predator. A coons saliva glands are virtually inactive. The old thought process was that coons "washed" their food when in reality they are simply wetting it to make it more palatable secondary to a lack of saliva, or to soften an older, dried out hardened piece of flesh.

    Just my two cents.
     
  9. av8torcrj

    av8torcrj Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Whatever it was reached through a 1x1 heavy gauge mesh, held a likely startled and flapping bird, pulled its wing through that small hole and began the dissection you see. I notice some evidence of scratch/ claw marks on some of the wooden structures in the vicinity. How a raptor would hold the bird through that heavy mesh is a bit of a mystery. I've baited a live trap with the carcass.
     
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Raptor reached through with foot, grabbed victim, pulled to side then began to feed. I will venture to say raptor was also small possibly even a sharp-shinned or even an American Kestrel. Victim is a small delicate bird yet bones are articulated and intact which is not consistent with a bone crunching raccoon or opossum but very consistent with a raptor. Raccoons do have good salivary function, old wivestail in place concerning need for washing food.


    I have watched raccoons consume chickens and they like roll it around as consuming it as well a dismember. Result is a wet item from a combination of saliva and body fluids from carcass.
     

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