Eye bubbles

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Meg-in-MT, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Meg-in-MT

    Meg-in-MT Free Ranging

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    Can anyone direct me to a thread about a hen with bubbles in her eye? Or just help me out with some info? I know I've read about it before, but my searches are futile.

    From what I remember, this is no good. Thanks in advance.

    -Meg
     
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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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  3. Meg-in-MT

    Meg-in-MT Free Ranging

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  4. Meg-in-MT

    Meg-in-MT Free Ranging

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    @Eggcessive I can take some pictures of her if that helps. It's in one eye, no other chickens seem to have it. Do you think I should cull her? Sounds like it's transmittable if it's MG
     
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  5. Meg-in-MT

    Meg-in-MT Free Ranging

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    Well, I've got four Delaware's and not a bubble eye in sight. Is this something that can come and go? Or more likely a pecked eye?
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    If you're not seeing any other respiratory disease symptoms, and neither are your other birds, it's possible there could be debris in your hens eye. An example would be dirt or dust from dust bathing, or some other debris. It's also possible she couldve scratched in or around her eye.
    Liberally flush her eye with saline solution, then apply a tiny bit of terramycin eye ointment in her eye as needed until healed.
    untitledter.png
     
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  7. Saaniya

    Saaniya Crowing

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    Bubbles in the eye is MG Mycoplasma Infection related with Chronic Respiratory Infection The Treatment Is Baytril® Or
    Doxycycline
    If she's a layer then Go with Doxycycline for 5-7 days in water
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    I wouldn’t cull her especially if she has been a part of your flock. MG is pretty much everywhere, kind of like Mareks disease. MG is a common bacteria found in a lot of the reproductive disorders, such as salpingitis and internal laying.

    As @dawg53 said, it might be something in the eye or an injury that has caused the bubbles. There was someone the other day on here whose chicken had been attacked and pecked, and the chicken had eye bubbles in one eye.

    I would get some Terramycin eye ointment and treat it. If it doesn’t improve, then I would use Tylan 50 injectable, but give it orally. It is a cattle medicine at most feed stores. You could do both now if you wish. Dosage is 1/4 ml per pound given orally 3 times a day.
     
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  9. Mosey2003

    Mosey2003 Crowing

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    Is there a reason so many recommend giving this orally rather than injecting? Is it just because it's easier?
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    It can cause muscle damage at the site, even in cows. Since it is supposed to be given intramuscularly, it would need to be given in the breast muscle 1/4 inch deep where it is safest. Not many are comfortable given injections properly, so I usually tell people to give it orally. A couple of years ago, most people could buy Tylan Soluble Powder at feed stores, and use that orally. So, it is just easier and safer.
    I have given it to one hen both ways, and haven’t seen any problems. I am not a big antibiotic user or advocate, but when people ask what to use, I usually tell them what will treat a certain disease. People should only use an antibiotic if they know what they are treating, and if they don’t use the right one, they are creating antibiotic resistance.
     

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