Fattening Up Chickens

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by BrianT, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. BrianT

    BrianT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I bought a couple of easter eggers yesterday and one of them looks a little skinny. What is the best way to fatten her up without impacting her health in a negative way? Thanks.
     
  2. 1_FnkyFrm

    1_FnkyFrm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pic?
     
  3. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    If your goal is to get eggs and she seems fine I'd let her put on weight gradually. Fat hens don't lay well so you'll want to be careful not to get your hens to fat. Also fat hens have more problems with egg laying in general, such as prolapse.

    On the other hand if your going to eat her I believe more protein will do it. I could be wrong though.
     
  4. BrianT

    BrianT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. Please disregard this question.
     
  5. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    High quality feed, scrambled or boiled eggs, leafy greens, lots of fresh water. Give her a wormer! If your other birds are a normal weight and one isnt, she could be egg bound, or full of worms that are robbing her of her food. Worms are contagious, so be on the look out with your other birds for signs of worms.

    I would seperate the hen from the others and give her lots of really good food and lots of healthy treats, like cooked eggs, cauliflower, seedless grapes, cantaloupe, oyster shell, cucumber, romaine lettuce, etc. Make sure she is getting the right amount of protein and vitamins.
     
  6. shopchicks

    shopchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Flax and sunflower seeds both contain a lot of fat, and can be added to the regular diet. They work for adding weight to horses, so I'm sure they'd work for chickens, too. [​IMG] No more than 10% of the diet should be flax, and I'd guess sunflower seeds should be similarly limited.
     
  7. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Correct Flax and Black Oil Sunflower Seed have a high oil content. The main reason people suggest less than 20% flax in a poultry diet is because it can impart a fishy flavor to eggs if fed in high amounts. Flax is used in a poultry diet to boost omega 3's in eggs. I am unaware of any suggested limits on BOSS, though I personally feed 20%. BOSS is a source plant source of the amino acid methionine.
    Both flax and BOSS spoil quickly once ground.

    If fat is desired it is my understanding a higher ratio of corn is fed to poultry to "finish" the bird.
    ON
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2010
  8. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    First I would say check them for mites and then worm them after that you can soak Barley in milk over night then top there feed with it. They will start putting on weight..

    Chris
     
  9. shopchicks

    shopchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Correct Flax and Black Oil Sunflower Seed have a high oil content. The main reason people suggest less than 20% flax in a poultry diet is because it can impart a fishy flavor to eggs if fed in high amounts. Flax is used in a poultry diet to boost omega 3's in eggs. I am unaware of any suggested limits on BOSS, though I personally feed 20%. BOSS is a source plant source of the amino acid methionine.
    Both flax and BOSS spoil quickly once ground.

    If fat is desired it is my understanding a higher ratio of corn is fed to poultry to "finish" the bird.
    ON

    Flax also contains precursors to cyanide, which is why the intake is generally limited (although the risk is small to negligible).

    http://www.understanding-horse-nutrition.com/flax-seed.html
     

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