Favorite Breed? Any You Hope to Add?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by MesMama, Mar 15, 2016.

  1. MesMama

    MesMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just curious :) Thought it might be fun to share, what's your favorite breed and why? Also, are there any breeds that you would like to add to your flock or that interest you?

    I only have experience with buff orpingtons, but it's been great! I'm adding Welsummers and Speckled Sussex in this year :)
    I'm super intrigued by Barnevelders and Chocolate Orpingtons, mainly because of their looks...does that make me shallow? Lol!

    Please share! [​IMG]
     
  2. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have had a great experience with all sorts.

    New Hampshire reds,Black/Red sex links,Bantams,Barred rocks,Leghorns,easter eggers.
     
  3. MesMama

    MesMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hear a lot about Easter Eggers [​IMG] All good things!
     
  4. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yeah I had one along time ago she was sweet,but sh egot picked on then started fighting making other hens bleed.
     
  5. MesMama

    MesMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh my!
     
  6. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    Here are my original 5, and I can tell you without a doubt that my flock - no matter how large or small - will never be without Easter Eggers!

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-easter-eggers-of-oleo-acres

    Just like all critters, you can have bad apples within any breed or variety. I've got 5 sweethearts now, counting the replacements I added last spring, plus Dumb Daphne the Flock Complainer for a total of 6. If Dumb Daphne had been my first Easter Egger, she'd have been my last Easter Egger so I'm glad I haven't painted them all with the same brush!
     
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  7. MesMama

    MesMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What a great write up! I love how you know them all so well <3 Very, very beautiful birds Blooie!!
     
  8. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    Thanks. I'm rather fond of them and still miss seeing Pearlygirl out there. Dumb Daphne the Flock Complainer is still around, as are Agatha, Gladys, and Mathilda the Cossack. We've added two more, Miss Carbuncle (named for the oddest shaped comb) and little Bumblebee. Bumblebee is bigger than a bantam and smaller than a standard size, and she's an egg laying machine. One of the things I like so much about Easter Eggers is that you can buy a dozen of them, and end up with 12 totally different looking birds. It's like they paint a rainbow on the ground when they're out in the lawn.
     
  9. MesMama

    MesMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pardon my ignorance ;*) But I had NO idea that EE's came in so many different colors! Just beautiful!!
     
  10. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    Hi Mesmama,
    If you want quality Speckled Sussex, do not go to the hatcheries. Just not there. If you like their stunning beauty and great temperament, buy from a breeder. Esp. in the Speckled variety, It is the toughest color to breed in Sussex, being a tricolor. Takes decades to get the gene pool stable enough to get a nice pattern to replicate regularly from generation to generation. The three top strains of the Speckled large fowl here in the USA are ( In no particular order) Walt Reichert, Gary Overton ( Mr. Sussex) and Tony Albrittion. You want to either buy from them or someone who very recently bought from them and/or has not crossed the strain into another strain. In Speckled, esp, do not cross strains to found your flock! That's very important. It will mess up the stability of the gene pool and take years to straighten out the color, unless you are a Master Breeder.
    I have contact info for all of the, just a sec, while I look it up. ( sent you a private message)
    Here's more on starting in Speckled Sussex:

    You are looking for foundation trio? What color? Make sure to tell the breeder you are seeking a "foundation" trio. Birds from their strain that are loosely enough related that they can be breed to each other for a linebreeding program. It des make a difference. Try looking at the breeder directory of the American Sussex Association website. Also try the BYC State thread for your State here at BYC. It is always good to start with the very best quality you can. , esp. in poultry where there are so many sex linked genes. And even more, in a tricolored variety like Speckled Sussex.
    -------
    If you have the top quality, Inbreed the Speckled Sussex, . If not, then line breed the birds AND WHEN YOU GET FOUNDATION QUALITY, THEN INBREED. they have plenty of biodiversity already. in fact they have too much diversity. 3 flocks? someone didn't understand this variety. it s the most difficult color to breed, being a tricolor. Historically the breed experts advise choosing a top quality vintage line bred strain and line breed it. One strain and line breed on it. In this color, unless you are very talented, one does not cross strains to found a flock. It takes many years to get the gene pool of flock stable enough to reliably reproduce a superior pattern in multiple generations. That said, you need to get with a Speckled Sussex specialist. Tony Albritton in Idaho or Gary Overton ( Mr. Sussex) Ohio. Walt Reichert KY. send them pics of your birds. side, top, front, and head study of each bird in a natural standing position. Have the breeder help you pick out birds for an inbreeding project. Then carefully listen to their counsel for the next 3 generations at least.
    Here's an example of doing it the right way. Skytop speckled Sussex bantams wanted to create a new strain. So they went to Gary Overton's top show quality strain dn crossed it to Edgar Mongold's top quality show quality strain. Then carefully winnowed the best from each strain to make their own. Now they are APA Master Breeders of bantam Speckled Sussex.
    http://www.reocities.com/skytopbantams/sussex.html "Lily" is a super example of the Overton strain of bantam Speckled Sussex.
    buy a trio (1 male, 2 females) or quad (2 males, 2 females) from them as started birds or adults. Don't start out in Sussex with eggs or chicks.
    this 9 page thesis is one of the best I have ever read ad is applicable to all varieties of Sussex. Written by a famous poultry man who later went on to be President of the British Poultry Club. It defines the breed , not just an era in breeding. an excellent read is the 8 page 1921 timeless essay on the Light Sussex by veteran breder and poultry judge William White Broomhead. He later became President of th British Poultry Association. It can be read online at: http://tinyurl.com/afbq753
    http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924003137332;view=1up;seq=5
    Best,
    Karen
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016

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