Favourite flavouring to add to boiled pasta for feeding hens

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Sire12, Sep 17, 2016.

  1. Sire12

    Sire12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got a few packets of cheap spaghetti as hen treats and they seem to like it, I boil it then cut it into worm sized lengths for them and serve it when it's cooled down a bit, is there anything I can add to it so they will enjoy it alot more, like some herbs, spices, sauces, a small amount of beef stock or something? They get their fermented mixed grain and layers pellets too

    Thanks
     
  2. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    I'm not sure what needs to be added. Mine love leftover boiled pasta plain, though. Maybe bits of finely chopped vegetables?
     
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  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    They don't have much in the line of taste buds so it probably doesn't need anything. However, herbs are good for them as is some type of meat like ground beef, pork or shellfish - if you're so inclined.
     
  4. Sire12

    Sire12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thx guys :) can I also ask a separate question here rather than posting a new thread on it, I got a blue orpington a couple daus ago and my other 2 hybrid hens have been bullying her, nothing too serious but pecking her if she gets too close (they are free range) so the poor orpington is on her own in the yard the other 2 won't let her forage along side them, if I get another docile timid breed of hen would she pair up with my new orp and be friends with her so that she won't be wandering around on her own anymore at the bottom of the pecking order?
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2016
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    That would be your best bet. Do you quarantine new birds?
     
  6. Sire12

    Sire12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ah ok I will do that then :) I'd love an australorp but they seem to be rare over here, are there any other docile breeds like an orpington that aren't great flyers ( 4 foot fence) and are ok egg layers that I could pair up with her?

    I haven't actually quarantined her I didn't think of that, but she's from a friend who keeps show birds, and I added wormer to their water this morning and sprayed their coop with some mite spray the day after she came, I forgot to get some DE to make a dust bath for them too to keep 'em nice and healthy
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    Lots of docile breeds. Here's a chart to give you some ideas.

    http://www.albc-usa.org/documents/chickenbreedcomparison.pdf

    I have another idea that may intrigue you and I know they exist in Ireland. Black Penedesencas. They're the only breed I raise any more.
    They are good with other chickens and never human aggressive. However, they are pretty wild in that they don't like to be around humans - or anything non chicken for that matter.
    But they lay lovely dark eggs. They're the only breed with white earlobes and lay a brown egg.
     
  8. dustcover

    dustcover Out Of The Brooder

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    You may want to consider a Speckled Sussex. Mine gets along quite nicely with my Buff Orpington, Barred Rock, White Leghorn, and 2 Reds. She is very friendly, lays nice eggs, and holds her own when confronted, but gets on with the others in a very congenial manner. They all free range during the day in my spacious backyard, and share the same run and coop roost at night.

    And since I throw a handful of birdseed on the ground as a treat for the flock once a day, whenever I exit the back door of the house she is the one that immediately comes to greet me. She is definitely not one to miss out on the daily 'candy'.
     
  9. lonniedeohio

    lonniedeohio Out Of The Brooder

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    For your first question, I would urge you not to feed your chickens pasta very often. As much as you want to spoil them, it may end up hurting them in the long run. In the same way processed grains make humans fat, it will do the same to your chickens. As your chickens gain fat, it messes with their reproductive tract and can cause blocked eggs. There are other consequences, but that is the first that comes to mind. I don't see anything with giving them an occasional fruit or vegetable (with the obvious exclusions like green tomatoes and apple cores), I just caution with calorie dense, nutritionally lacking treats.

    As for introducing a new bird to your flock, first and foremost it is recommended that you quarantine your new bird for several weeks to insure they don't have a disease. When you bring a new bird into your flock there are many aspects of this that place stress on the bird (imagine you being moved by yourself to a new town, lots of stress). Some birds have suppressed diseases that never emerge until put in a highly stressful position. To avoid a loss of your entire flock, keeping the new bird quarantined to allow for her to adjust to her new environment will ensure the safety of your flock. If you feel like skipping this step and hoping for the best, it may take several weeks or months for the new birds to accept her. That's just part of life. She may never be accepted, but chances are she'll work her way into the flock. You just have to be patient.
     

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