FDA to require prescription for livestock antibiotics

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by LIBERTYNY, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. LIBERTYNY

    LIBERTYNY Out Of The Brooder

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  2. Working Dog Doc

    Working Dog Doc Out Of The Brooder

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    Has nothing to do with government interference and everything to do with preventing producers from unnecessarily and incorrectly using antibiotics leading to nasty antibiotic resistance. I'll give you an example...about two months ago, I had a client ask me about coughing in one of his Boer goat does. I explained it was likely due to pneumonia, but he didn't want to "pump her full of antibiotics." So he went down to the feed store told Mr. Feed Store Owner he wanted something for his goat that wasn't an antibiotic. He showed me the bottle of the stuff that he was trying to (incorrectly) give to his goats in their water (which doesn't work well anyways). It was a bottle of generic Albon (sulfadimethoxine). He literally tried to argue with me (as a vet) that this wasn't an antibiotic. [​IMG] And that's an example of treating an animal that *is* actually ill and would benefit from therapeutic antibiotics. Not counting the medicated feed given purely for promotion of growth.

    Whenever I script out a bottle of antibiotics for food animal clients, I only sell as much as they will need for a specific animal, not a whole bottle's worth that they can dose inappropriately to another animal. I wonder if that's one reason we see fluroquinolones in chicken, even though their use is banned. Someone gets a bottle of large animal Baytril for their calf with respiratory disease and then sells it to the guy down the road who raises chickens. Then it ends up as a meat residue in the food chain. Physicians who over prescribe things like azithromycin (the "z pak") for simple things like colds as a part of CYA medicine are also to blame.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012
  3. LIBERTYNY

    LIBERTYNY Out Of The Brooder

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    I agree with most of what you said

    but this law targets small farm owners - most small farm owners do not engauge in that type of "over medicating" As where large farms do However large farms employ vets so their activitys will remain the same
    hence F***ing me a responsible citzen and countless others
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    The FDA falls DOES fall under the U.S. Government. More federal government interference/regulations in our daily lives...like Europe.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FDA
     
  5. Working Dog Doc

    Working Dog Doc Out Of The Brooder

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    All my food animal clients (which are small or hobby farms. If you don't use medicated feed, it does not affect you at all. In fact, it would put you on a more equal playing field with those who give medicated feeds to get extra growth out of their production animals despite having them live in less than ideal conditions. The vets, even on large corporate farms, will still legally have to prescribe antibiotics for therapeutic purposes only. If they can detect illegal residues in meat, milk, or eggs, that will hopefully be traceable (it is for bulk tanks in milk anyways) and I'd love to see the involved parties fined heavily for not following the law.

    To me, it's a safety thing. Antibiotic resistance is an extremely serious problem in human medicine. No one wants to go into the hospital with a relatively minor problem and end up with a fatal MRSA infection. Constantly dosing animals with a low level of antibiotics in the food OR having certain antibiotics available at the feed store and knowing how many producers do not dose their animals correctly or for long enough is exactly how we are selecting for the super bugs that kill people. As one of my vet school professors was fond of saying, do not tease the microbes. My job as a vet is to care for animal and public health (the public health part is actually in our oath) and help producers make decisions to both care for their animals and make good decisions financially for their farm.
     
  6. Yknot

    Yknot Out Of The Brooder

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    More rules against small farmers. More abuse by large corporations. Now it will cost more to be a small farmer and make it easier for the large corporations to supply substandard food to people.The large chicken farms where the ones found with illegal anti-biotics in the meat. Thank God on a different forum a poster showed how we can make our penicillin. We must get our government under our control soon.
     
  7. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    An excellent time to start preventative health regimens for livestock.
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I don't know any backyard chicken keeper who regularly gives their chickens feed with antibiotics in it; and to promote growth? Hardly. Most do raise chicks with starter laced with amprolium, a thiamine analog to help build immunity to cocci, but that is most definitely not an antibiotic. I do not and have NEVER advised using an antibiotic on a chicken other than penicillin for reproductive infections or wounds or, in very rare cases, Tylan for a known pneumonia infection (something non-contagious--for contagious respiratory illness, my advise is always to cull the bird).

    Guess it's time to stock up on some penicillin and syringes because I will not get a scrip for that for a chicken. Most other chicken keepers wouldn't, either, I suspect. This will prevent most BYC folks from being able to give penicillin to their own birds when they are wounded, etc, forcing them to get the paid advice of some vet who knows nothing about chickens.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2012
  9. LIBERTYNY

    LIBERTYNY Out Of The Brooder

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    May I ask about your method of making penicillin, I know 2 ways with Cantaloupe or salume (spelled wrong) But their must be others ?

    I also have ben researching alternative antibiotics colloidal silver and garlic looks promising it's also known as russian penicillin Russian Penicillin -
    any experiance with these or others

    So before this stuff becomes restricted I am going to stock up. What would be good to have for a medium flock? Tylan and penicillin
    I know most antibiotics do not store well doxycycline ect. does anyone know about the rest ?
     
  10. Yknot

    Yknot Out Of The Brooder

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    From Daily Survival.


    Saturday, August 14, 2010

    Home Made Penicillin


    [​IMG]

    from Catman's Litterbox byCatman
    I'm not entirely sure where this came from, but thanks to who ever put these instructions together.

    If you've followed the progress of big pharma, many excellent antibiotics have fallen out of favor either because one or two strains of a bug have developed a resistance to the drug, or because the patent ran out and it just wasn't profitable enough.

    Many infections can still be effectively treated with such tried and true antibiotics such as penicillin.

    If things keep heading down the drain, this may be very valuable information. Imagine if you can synthesize an antibiotic when no one else can. How valuable do you think that will be?

    About the ingredients:

    Lactose Monohydrate is commonly known as "milk sugar". It is available in health food stores, and online at places like E-bay and Amazon. Sometimes it is sold under simply "lactose powder".

    Corn Starch shouldn't need any explanation. Available in grocery stores.

    Sodium Nitrate available online and in chemistry supply stores.

    Magnesium Sulfate is commonly known as "Epsom Salts" and is available in drug stores.

    Monopotassium Phosphate is available online, and also in health food stores and drug stores.

    Glucose Monohydrate (Dextrose) is available online and in health food stores.

    Zinc Sulfate is available online and also in drug stores and health food stores.

    Manganese Sulfate is available online and also in home improvement / hardware stores and gardening centers.

    The liquid referred to before the outlined extraction process can be consumed or used as a topical antibacterial. If you seek to form a powdered, stable version of the drug, you will need to perform the extraction process.

    HCL (Hydrochloric Acid) is also known as Muriatic Acid and is available in pool supply stores.

    Ethyl Acetate is available online.

    All of these substances are able to be grown, extracted and synthesized from common materials, so even if you run out of any stored ingredients you have put up, you can always make more of your own. Just do the research and put the processes away in your little notebook.


    CULTURE OF PENICILLIN

    USE ASEPTIC TECHNIQUE THROUGHOUT THIS PROCEDURE

    Step 1
    Prepare a penicillium culture by exposing a slice of bread or citrus peel to the air at 70 deg. F until a bluish-green mold develops.

    Cut two slices of whole wheat bread into ½ inch cubes and place in a 750ml Erlenmeyer flask with a cotton (non-absorbent) plug. It is important that the bread does not contain any mold inhibitors such as “mycoban”. Sterilize the flask and contents in a pressure cooker for at least 15 minutes at 15 pounds. An alternate method is to place in an oven at 315 deg F for one hour.

    Using a sterile transfer loop (flamed) transfer the spores from the bread or peel into the flask containing the bread cubes.

    Allow the cubes to incubate in the dark at 70 deg F for 5 days. After incubation, store in the refrigerator for not longer than two weeks.

    Step 2
    Prepare one liter of the following media:

    Lactose Monohydrate 44.0 gm
    Corn Starch 25.0 gm
    Sodium Nitrate 3.0 gm
    Magnesium Sulfate 0.25 gm
    Potassium Phosphate Mono 0.50 gm
    Glucose Monohydrate 2.75 gm
    Zinc Sulfate 0.044 gm
    Manganese Sulfate 0.044 gm

    Dissolve in order in 500ml of cold tap water and add sufficient cold tap water to make one liter.

    Adjust pH to 5.0-5.5 using HCL. Fill a series of milk bottles with a quantity of this media. Use only enough media so that when the bottle is placed on its side the media will not touch the cotton plug.

    Sterilize the bottles and media in a pressure cooker or stove as previously outlined. When cool, inoculate with spores from the bread cubes. Use approximately the equivalent of one tablespoon.

    Allow bottles to incubate on their sides at 70 deg F for 7 days. It is important that the bottles are not disturbed during this time. At the end of 7 days if your culture is capable of producing penicillin it will be dispersed in the liquid portion of the media.

    Filter fermentation media, plug with cotton and refrigerate immediately. Use as soon as possible.

    Step 3
    To extract the penicillin the following procedure may be attempted. Do the following technique as rapidly as possible.

    Adjust the cold fermentation filtrate to pH 2.2 using .01/N HCL. Mix cold filtrate with cold ethyl acetate in a separatory funnel and shake well for 30 seconds.

    Drain the ethyl acetate into a beaker which has been placed in an ice bath and repeat the process until all filtrate is depleted.

    Add 1% potassium acetate and mix. Permit ethyl acetate (flammable) to evaporate. This can be induced by a constant flow of air over the top of the beaker.

    The remaining crystals are a mixture of potassium penicillin and potassium acetate.

    WARNING: DO THE EXTRACTION AS RAPIDLY AS POSSIBLE!

    *authors note: potassium acetate is a preservative and is commonly used as an acidity regulator in processed foods. It'll help the penicillin last longer on the shelf provided it is kept in a dry, closed container and away from light and heat.
    [​IMG]
     
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