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Feather loss/ bump around eyes

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by itsalladream, Jun 20, 2018.

  1. itsalladream

    itsalladream Songster 7 Years

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    Sep 19, 2010
    Mobile, AL
    My Coop
    A few of might girls seem to be missing feathers and have bumps around one of their eyes. Besides that, they seem to be acting normal. Thoughts? The last seems to have a bunch of little bubbles in the corner of her eye.
    20180620_165801.jpg 20180620_165925.jpg 20180620_170617.jpg 20180620_170940.jpg
     
    azygous likes this.
  2. Brahma Chicken5000

    Brahma Chicken5000 Araucana Addict Premium Member

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    That doesn’t look good. I’ll tag some experts that will be able to help you out. @azygous @casportpony.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member 7 Years

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    southern Ohio
    I see bubbles in the eyes of the 2 lower pictured chickens. That could be caused by mycoplasma gallisepticum or MG, a chronic respiratory disease. Have you seen them pecking each others’ eyelids or have you had a lot of insects that could be biting them? Because of a possibility of MG, I would be tempted to medicate them with Tylan 50 injectable, which you may give orally to each pullet. Dosage is 1/4 ml per pound 2-3 times a day for 3 to 5 days.
     
    azygous and townchicks like this.
  4. azygous

    azygous Free Ranging 8 Years

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    From the symptoms and the fact that more than one individual is affected, I believe you may be looking at a CRD (Chronic Respiratory Disease) called Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Mycoplasma is a bacteria that causes swelling around the eyes and often bubbling from the eye.

    It can kill if left untreated. The treatment is Tylan 50 given twice a day orally at .25 ml by oral syringe per bird for five days. In addition, get some terramycin ophthalmic ointment or drops and use it in the eyes.
     
  5. itsalladream

    itsalladream Songster 7 Years

    36
    11
    104
    Sep 19, 2010
    Mobile, AL
    My Coop
    Thanks for the responses. I don't have a way to separate them, so should I treat all?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member 7 Years

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    southern Ohio
    itsalladream and azygous like this.
  7. itsalladream

    itsalladream Songster 7 Years

    36
    11
    104
    Sep 19, 2010
    Mobile, AL
    My Coop
    Of course this is the first time they have gone in the coop by themselves at night, and I had to get them out. I did hear one of them sneezing when I went to them. The past couple of days she was making noises that sounded kinda duck-ish, so I thought she was finding her cluck, but I guess not. How quickly should I see improvement? Thanks again for all of the input!
    Another question, mostly out of curiosity. I've had them for about a week and a half. Is this likely something from where they were, or something that was present on my property? They had been kept in a 2' x 5' wire enclosure with, I'm guessing, 40 - 50 other 5 - 8 week olds.
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member 7 Years

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Oh my, that sure was overcrowding. The sneezing fits in with MG. Hopefully the Tylan will help in a few days, but it doesn’t cure them of the disease. It is chronic, and they have it in their bodies. They may get symptoms again if they are stressed, such as during cold weather or during a molt. Some may, some may not. Denagard is another drug that some use to treat mycoplasma if they have it in their flocks. You can buy it online. The birds you bought probably were exposed to it by carriers at their old home. Your flock should be considered carriers and you should not add birds or rehome them, since they can spread the disease.
     

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