Fecal exam

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sue Gremlin, Jan 25, 2018.

  1. Sue Gremlin

    Sue Gremlin Songster

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    I thought this might be interesting to share. I did a fecal exam on my chickens today, one of them has intermittent diarrhea, and I am a parasitology student so need the practice. :)

    My girls are being treated with fenbendazole, they are apparently looooooaded with worms! The egg in the middle is from a fluke, and the other, wibbly-looking morulated eggs are strongylids and cecal worms.

    IMG_4428.JPG
     
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  2. Sue Gremlin

    Sue Gremlin Songster

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    A wider shot of the smear.
     

    Attached Files:

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  3. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    Oh wow! I'm so sorry that your girls have such a high worm burden. I thought those ones with multiple particles inside were going to be tapeworm segments, until I read your text. How old are the hens? Do you have any idea why their worm burden is so high? Was this a sample from a single hen (the one that has loose droppings) or a group sample?
    Thank you so much for posting. It's really interesting in a :sick sort of way!
     
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  4. Sue Gremlin

    Sue Gremlin Songster

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    They have so many worms because I don't have them on a regular deworming schedule. They are about 3 years old. It was a direct smear taken from one chicken, which means that I didn't concentrate the worm eggs. It's a LOT of worm eggs! They are not sick or symptomatic at all. They are free-range so I guess it's not shocking that they have so many worms. God knows what kind of bugs and worms and other intermediate hosts they eat! We live in an area with lots of wild animals about.
     
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  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Great thread!
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Hey, I have a great cecal worm picture if you're interested. :D
     
  7. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    Actually it is far less likely for them to have a heavy worm burden if they free range than if they are penned in my experience.

    I appreciate that you are a parasitology student, but are you quite sure you are correctly interpreting what you are seeing as worm eggs. By the sound of it, this is not a "faecal float" test but a straight smear of poop onto a slide (apologies if I have misunderstood you)...... which may make a significant difference to what you are seeing. I'm no expert by any means but just concerned that you may be misinterpreting your results here, especially when you free range and are not seeing sick birds.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    What are these?
    fecal_1.png
     
  9. Sue Gremlin

    Sue Gremlin Songster

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    You're correct, it's not a float, I mis-titled the thread, I am just noticing now! It is a direct fecal smear. I took a small amount of feces and put it on a slide with a drop of saline on it. I was shocked to see so much in it, since a smear does not concentrate the eggs like a float would do.

    I am sure they are worm eggs, your questions are all good ones! There are for sure plenty of artifacts in there, too. But I do see a TON of worm eggs. What kind of strongylids, who knows. I'd have to culture them to be sure. It's all very interesting.

    Your point about free-ranging vs penned chickens is an interesting one. I would think they'd have a lot more exposure to intermediate parasite hosts (bugs, worms, rodents, snakes, other bird droppings) while free-ranging. But I am not a terribly experienced chicken keeper. Do you think your observation is because of increased exposure to their own feces in a penned environment?
     
  10. Sue Gremlin

    Sue Gremlin Songster

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    I don't think I can say since they are so distorted (I am still trying to work out why--probably from the cold). Based on size and structure, I think we can say they are some species of strongylid. At first I thought they were gapeworm eggs, but I don't think so.
     

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