Feed cost per pound to raise Cornish X broilers?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by jungleexplorer2, Mar 31, 2017.

  1. jungleexplorer2

    jungleexplorer2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, so I was at a feed store in another city and they were desperately trying to get rid of some 2 week old conrish x chicks. I had thought about doing this at some point and the price temptation got the best of me, so I made them an offer of $20 for all they had left. I ended up with 50 chicks. Not bad.

    So, I have had them for a couple weeks now and let me tell you, these things plow through food! I have gone through four 50 bags of food so far and they are about maybe 1.5 pounds. Now I thought these things were suppose to get to 5lbs in six weeks. That means they would half to put on another 3 to 4 pounds in the next two weeks. I doubt that is going to happen. I am figuring maybe another 3 to 4 weeks.

    Anyway, I got to thinking about feed cost. I did some math based on some info I got of the Nutrena website that said that it would take 9lbs of feed to raise a cronish X chick for 6 weeks and 5lbs of weight. By my calculations, at $14 a bag (what I am paying for chick starter/grower) that would be $0.50 a pound, based on Nutrena's numbers. I am just not sure if my calculations are correct.

    Here is how I calculated.

    $14 ÷ 50lb = 0.28 cents per pound of feed.

    $0.28 X 9lb (of feed) = $2.52 total feed cost per bird (based on 5lb bird at six weeks)

    $2.52 ÷ 5lb (meat) = $0.504 per pound of meat.

    Just wondering if I did that right?

    I know my cost will be different. Since I got them at two weeks old, that cost was included in the cost of the birds when I bought them. But it also means that I don't have to feed them for the full 6 weeks and that even if I have to feed them for an extra week or two, the cost in the end will about the same as if I raised them from day one.

    Since I did not plan to buy them when I did, I am running to catch up here with my original plan of raising them in a chicken tractor on my wheat field. I have been building one over the last week (storms have caused set backs) and am getting close to getting it ready. It is project I have been designing for some time and I am using 90% repurposed materials to build it. When it is done it will have on board, solar powered, automatic watering and feeding system, and eventually a predator deterrent system. Here are som pictures of my process. I am also making a step by step video for those who might want to build their own.


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  2. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    You got $0.504 per lb of meat. I am sure they are talking about a 5lb live weight. I would have to do some home-work to see what they dress at 5lb live, but probably about 1/4th of the live weight for eatable meat----I can not eat the bones.
     
  3. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    Tractor is good built, but with the weight-stationary axles--how are you going to turn it? Pick up one side and turn??
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
  4. jungleexplorer2

    jungleexplorer2 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am going to install a turn tire. It's my own custom invention, and I have not built it yet, so I can't show you a picture, and it is difficult to describe. But basically, there will be a four foot verticle lever on the outside that you will pull down to the left which will raise the front up onto a turn wheel that will be positioned perpendicular to the other wheels. This will lift the two front wheels off the ground and allow the whole thing to be turned with ease. It will make more sense when you see it work in the video.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
  5. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    I am with you 100%----that's good. I do not know your age but when you get over 60 you for sure want it made easy on the body!!!
     
  6. jungleexplorer2

    jungleexplorer2 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am about 10 years behind you, but I was crushed by a 2000 pound metal beam when I was 24 and spent years in a back brace. I took ten years of suffering and pain for me to accept that I had to find new ways to live and do what I want in my NEW Body, and stop reinjuring myself trying to act like I still had my old strong body. I use my brains now a lot more then what is left of my brawn. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
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  7. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Live weight of 5 lbs to dress weight would be about 3 lbs carcass- excluding giblets. Using your feed numbers and a 3 lbs final product that's 84 cents a pound in feed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
  8. jungleexplorer2

    jungleexplorer2 Out Of The Brooder

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    It's done! Well, at least the main structure. Still need to put the feed and water system, but the chicks are going in as soon as I recoperate from moving it 200 yards by hand.


    Front
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    in the field and ready for birds.

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  9. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    Looking Good!!! You might want to get a piece of 1x4===screw it and let it hang out about 1/2" past the tin edge----it will feel a lot better to hit your head on it than the edge of that tin. LOL
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  10. jungleexplorer2

    jungleexplorer2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. Not a bad Idea there. I have exausted all of my used lumber, so I'll have to buy some, if I want to do that. I built it all with used wood scavanged from other projects. I just had to by three sheets of OSB sheathing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017

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