feed date of manufacture/expiration

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by SueT, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. SueT

    SueT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've been feeding Purina Flock Raiser and never checked the date of manufacture, but when the most recent bag smelled kind of funky at the end, I realized I needed to learn how to check the date. At the store I saw various dates and didn't understand the code...so I called Purina. They told me that the first number represents the year. So 7 means 2017. Jun01 means June 1st. Since I learned on BYC forums that you want it less than 6 months old, and preferably less than 6 weeks, I chose this one, only 2 weeks old when I bought it. They had bags that were several months old.
    Maybe most of you already know this, but it was news to me. And to the employees at the store.
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  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I would not have known how they label their bags. I buy a brand that moves quickly off the shelf so it's always fresh. Crazy that there would be feed a few months old on the shelf with fresh stuff, they must not rotate their stock at your store.
     
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  3. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    I always check mill dates! Learned the hard way a few years ago, with old feed and a vitamin deficiency problem. Never again! Mary
     
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  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Yep, I have walked out of a well known national feed store numerous times without buying their feed b/c the feed I want is 2 or more months old. Other times, I walk out b/c they have NONE of the formula I need. I'm finding that it's simply easier to go to their competitor, and have let the managers know that that's where I'm headed when I ask them to check out back to see if they have X feed available. My rule of thumb is that I intend to have a bag of feed used up before it is 6 weeks past mill date.

    As for managing a multi age flock in chick season: I plan to use up all of my layer feed before hatch date, and simply switch the whole flock over to starter. They all stay on starter until the new pullets are getting their cluck, then I start them all back on layer. (based on feed prices, sometimes I keep them on starter or multi flock indefinitely.)
     
  5. GC-Raptor

    GC-Raptor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I like and use both Purina and Nutrena Naturewise. I buy the one that is fresher, even if the other is cheaper. I have only 5 hens. A bag lasts 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 months depending on season. For me to use within 6 weeks of mill date is impossible. My girls are 14 MONTHS old and give me 32 to 35 eggs a week. My girls have never had any ill effects.
    Keep your feed in the coolest room of your home, not in basement, with the bag tightly closed with a bag clip. 20170401_165315.jpg Only store enough feed in or near coop for 1 week, 2 at most, especially in hot or damp weather. GC Edited: I had my hens at 14 weeks old, they are 14 months. GC
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2017
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I do realize that for some people, it's not possible to use up a bag of feed within the recommended 6 week time frame. Good storage, in a cool dry area will help extend the life of the feed for sure.

    I did a quick google search regarding extending the storage life of flour. It will keep longer if refrigerated, and up to 2 years if stored in the freezer. So, I'm guessing that storage would be similarly extended if the feed were refrigerated or frozen. the big issue with this type of storage is that it must be air tight, and brought to room temp before the bag is opened, or perhaps frozen or refrigerated in useable sized bags/containers.
     
  7. KikisGirls

    KikisGirls Be Happy! Read more. Premium Member

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    Thanks for sharing this with us!
     
  8. GC-Raptor

    GC-Raptor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The problem with a refrigerator is high humidity. A freezer may get frost on feed, then melt when you remove. I don't do either for chicken feed, so won't recommend either. GC
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2017

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